Inspired by spaghetti hoops

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jillbean
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Inspired by spaghetti hoops

Postby jillbean » Fri Jul 03, 2009 11:16 pm

I am continually impressed to see all the different parts of the globe represented here at WTF! and also intrigued by some of the terms and vocabulary I am seeing as I read through posts. Not too long ago I was educated about "spaghetti hoops" in the UK being the same as "SpaghettiO's" in the USA (thanks ZebraWarriorPrincess) :D . I was thinking it might be fun to do same basic vocabulary comparisons and see what we find out!


Anyone have anything similar?

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Faith
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Re: Inspired by spaghetti hoops

Postby Faith » Fri Jul 03, 2009 11:24 pm

I found out the other day that Jello here in the US is called jelly in the UK. I didn't know that.

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Re: Inspired by spaghetti hoops

Postby curlisue » Fri Jul 03, 2009 11:32 pm

Yeah, the word fanny certainly means something different here in the UK, and it always makes me giggle when Mel mentions her "Fanny pack" which we would call a "Bum bag" here.

When I visited Toronto a couple of years ago I asked for mature (meaning strong) cheese, the deli person had no idea what I was on about. When I explained, they said "Oh, you mean sharp cheese", and I was amazed that something so seemingly ordinary could have such a different name from the one we use. :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
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CailenBraern
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Re: Inspired by spaghetti hoops

Postby CailenBraern » Fri Jul 03, 2009 11:34 pm

There's the great kebab debate, which has been discussed many a time.
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Re: Inspired by spaghetti hoops

Postby curlisue » Fri Jul 03, 2009 11:39 pm

Faith wrote:I found out the other day that Jello here in the US is called jelly in the UK. I didn't know that.


That's right Faith :) Also, what Americans call Jelly we in the UK call Jam, and chips here are what Americans would call fries. We call potato chips crisps here in old blighty :?
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Re: Inspired by spaghetti hoops

Postby tvldiva » Sat Jul 04, 2009 12:13 am

We are two nations separated by a common language.

I'm amused(for some reason) the different pronunciation of Adidas. Years back, I heard a report on the news while in Scotland about Adidas. It wasn't until I read it in a paper a couple of days later what company they had been talking about. :worry:
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Re: Inspired by spaghetti hoops

Postby Emafer » Sat Jul 04, 2009 12:31 am

I'm from the US but livedi n the UK for a while and I still occasionaly call things by thier British name and people here don't know what I mean.
Fanny is one of my favorite mixed meaning words. In lake Tahoe there is a bridge called "Fanny Bridge" beucase everyone would ben over and look in the water and from the road you'd see a bunch of bums flying in the air. Also, here in Aspen the "Bunny Slope" is called "Fanny Hill" beucase you fall on your fanny when you're learning to ski. The Brits LOVE that one. Here's some other's I can think of:
UK- US
Dust Bin- Trash Can
Shopping Trolly- Grocery Basket
Sweater- Jumper
Vest- Tank Top
Zed- The Letter Z (I think that Zed Zed Top is HILAIOURS!)

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Faith
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Re: Inspired by spaghetti hoops

Postby Faith » Sat Jul 04, 2009 2:38 am

I'm trying to think of ones from when I was in NZ. Zed instead of z was one. Chips instead of fries. Lollies or sweets instead of candy. Dinner was called tea.

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vmh
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Re: Inspired by spaghetti hoops

Postby vmh » Sat Jul 04, 2009 3:09 am

Faith wrote:I'm trying to think of ones from when I was in NZ. Zed instead of z was one. Chips instead of fries. Lollies or sweets instead of candy. Dinner was called tea.


Lollies! I love that for some reason. I'm going to start using that in place of the word "candy".
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Re: Inspired by spaghetti hoops

Postby jillbean » Sat Jul 04, 2009 6:00 am

curlisue wrote:Yeah, the word fanny certainly means something different here in the UK, and it always makes me giggle when Mel mentions her "Fanny pack" which we would call a "Bum bag" here.

When I visited Toronto a couple of years ago I asked for mature (meaning strong) cheese, the deli person had no idea what I was on about. When I explained, they said "Oh, you mean sharp cheese", and I was amazed that something so seemingly ordinary could have such a different name from the one we use. :rolleyes: :rolleyes:



I recently found out what fanny means in the UK; a situation ripe for many misunderstandings and giggles I am sure!

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Re: Inspired by spaghetti hoops

Postby jillbean » Sat Jul 04, 2009 6:06 am

I am remembering seeing some New Zealand-specific terms (possibly on a different FotC fan site??) and I liked that what Americans call coolers are called chilly bins there. Way more fun! I am liking chilly bins and lollies quite a bit.

And then I think there was something like shudder bar or judder bar for speed bumps. Which I remember being called speed ramps when I was in Ireland; I was so confused the first couple of times I saw signs indicating such in that I was looking for an exit or entrance ramp on the street we were on yet we just kept going over bumps!

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Faith
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Re: Inspired by spaghetti hoops

Postby Faith » Sat Jul 04, 2009 6:52 am

Chilly bins, there's one I forgot. We always had to keep our liquor in the chilly bins under the bus because we weren't allowed to bring anything alcoholic on the bus.

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Re: Inspired by spaghetti hoops

Postby helgecko » Sat Jul 04, 2009 7:57 am

We Aussies call chilly bins "eskys" :)

We use "lollies" and "zed" (I do also find "zed zed top" hilarious though, I don't think anyone actually calls them that), and generally most NZ phrasing is the same as ours.

A vest/ tanktop we call a "singlet" though. So it took me a second to figure out why Jemaine tried to have Bret deported, but once I did... :roll2:
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Re: Inspired by spaghetti hoops

Postby curlisue » Sat Jul 04, 2009 8:38 am

Candy in the US, and the lovely lollies in NZ are called sweets/sweeties in the UK :D
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CailenBraern
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Re: Inspired by spaghetti hoops

Postby CailenBraern » Sat Jul 04, 2009 10:07 am

Continuing the vest theme, I think, what we call a vest in the UK, Americans call a wifebeater? And flipping that around, sometimes what Americans call vests, we call waistcoats?
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