Learning Languages

Everything else you can poke a stick at. And then some.
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canattack
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Re: Learning Languages

Postby canattack » Mon Aug 24, 2009 8:24 pm

SheWolf wrote:What about pogue mahone em? That's about all I know in Irish. :twisted: I also know it's equivalent in Spanish. There are handy things to know.

I know a girl named Roisin. We pronounce it Rosaleen. The family is from Ireland but she was born in the US.

http://www.encyclo.co.uk/define/roisin


Do you mean póg mo thóin? Means kiss my ass :lol:
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biscuit
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Re: Learning Languages

Postby biscuit » Mon Aug 24, 2009 8:31 pm

I'm fascinated with the kinship between languages. Norwegian is a Germanic language and shares a lot of words, or word roots, with other Germanic languages. Since English is also a Germanic language, albeit heavily influenced by Latin languages since 1066 and all that, some of the words are the same or very similar.

I've noticed that a lot of the names of the different parts of the human anatomy are similar:

TÃ¥ (taw) - toe

Fot - foot

Legg - leg

Arm - arm

Hand - hand

Finger - finger

Cool, eh? :D :geek:
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Re: Learning Languages

Postby Emafer » Mon Aug 24, 2009 10:34 pm

canattack wrote:
Emafer wrote:
canattack wrote:Fear cheile - means together man :lol:



I love that! "together man". OK but how do you pronounce it.


Far Kayla :lol:


LOVE IT! That is sooo my new term for my husband. And people are going to be all confused and ask me what that means hahahahaha.

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canattack
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Re: Learning Languages

Postby canattack » Mon Aug 24, 2009 11:39 pm

Glad I helped you and your together man :lol:
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Re: Learning Languages

Postby Emafer » Tue Aug 25, 2009 12:13 am

I totally LOVE that it's "together man" that's perfect. I don't like the term "husband" very much and the English language has failed me so YAY for Irish!

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seasick_sarah
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Re: Learning Languages

Postby seasick_sarah » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:44 am

Ozpot wrote:
bakergirl30 wrote:
Ozpot wrote:Aw, Suzy! :hug: That stinks on ice.

Apparently Mozart wrote a song in German called Leck mich im Arsch, meaning lick me in the... bum. :roll:



:shock: Really?? wow..


Leck mich im Arsch is a canon in B-flat major composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, K. 231 (K. 382c), with lyrics in German. It was one of a set of at least six canons probably written in Vienna in 1782.[1] Sung by six voices as a three-part round, it is thought to be a party piece for his friends.

A literal translation of the song's title and lyrics into English would be "Lick me in the arse". A more idiomatic translation would be "Kiss my arse", or even "Get stuffed".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leck_mich_im_Arsch


Mozart was an odd fellow. :|


:shock:

Hab ich nie gewusst! (I never knew that!)

My dad's German....also spreche ich ein bisschen Deutsch...and I'm learning Dutch and....Welsh...cos I'm weird like that. :rolleyes:

I also love looking at etymologies and the relationships between languages...I really should have majored in linguistics but I knew there weren't many job opportunities in the field... :? But I'm doing speech pathology, which I love :D
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Re: Learning Languages

Postby Emafer » Tue Aug 25, 2009 5:38 am

seasick_sarah wrote:
I also love looking at etymologies and the relationships between languages...I really should have majored in linguistics but I knew there weren't many job opportunities in the field.


Me to, I considered a linguistics minor but I was a double major so they wouldn't let me do a minor.

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munchkin
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Re: Learning Languages

Postby munchkin » Tue Aug 25, 2009 12:03 pm

Sarah, I did Dutch for a couple of years at Glasgow Uni night school. I found it facinating as there are tons of old Scots words which clearly have Dutch roots. During the centuries that Scotland and England were at war with each other, Scotland traded with (what is now) the Netherlands, and this not only influenced the Scots language but also architecture (I won't bore you with details!).

The verb "kijken" to look (pronounce "kay (as in "sky")-ken". In Scots we say "keek" to mean a little look. We also call our church "kirk" and a large box to hold articles is a "kist" in Scots "Kist" in Dutch is a box. There are many more.

The only problem I have found is that all Dutch people speak english and not many people outside the Netherlands and Belgium speak Dutch, so there's not many opportunities to practice.

Enjoy your lessons!

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biscuit
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Re: Learning Languages

Postby biscuit » Tue Aug 25, 2009 12:07 pm

munchkin wrote:
The verb "kijken" to look (pronounce "kay (as in "sky")-ken". In Scots we say "keek" to mean a little look. We also call our church "kirk" and a large box to hold articles is a "kist" in Scots "Kist" in Dutch is a box. There are many more.





That's interesting, M:)

In Norwegian a little look is 'kik' (keek), a church is a 'kirke' and a box/trunk is a 'kiste' :wink:
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seasick_sarah
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Re: Learning Languages

Postby seasick_sarah » Tue Aug 25, 2009 12:22 pm

Ooh, I love Scots! One of my favourite books (no joke) is The Encyclopaedia of the English Language by David Crystal...which is actually a whacking great encyclopaedia, not just a title they chose to make it sound interesting... I've just about read it cover to cover, and I learned a lot about all the different dialects and their influences. I like Scots especially because I can pick the Germanic influence myself without being told; makes me feel all smart like. :lol: My mum's from Lancashire and there are gorgeous Germanic words they use there too...sadly I can't think of any at the moment! I watched Melvyn Bragg's show about the English language a while back and they said something about Scandinavians being able to understand the Northerners because they had so many dialect words in common. I, for one, was impressed!

And being an amateur linguist, I get a lot of fun out of listening to the accents when I watch FotC because I sit there thinking "that's from Scottish English", "that's from Welsh", "that's from southern English" etc. :shock: There are worse hobbies, I suppose... My aunt's actually from NZ but I never gave the accent much thought until I started watching FotC.

I love "They're like, 'where's the caahhr/' and we're like 'whier's the carr\". :rotfl:
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canattack
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Re: Learning Languages

Postby canattack » Tue Aug 25, 2009 12:36 pm

:lol:
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biscuit
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Re: Learning Languages

Postby biscuit » Tue Aug 25, 2009 12:38 pm

I don't think it's weird at all to read an encyclopaedia of language from cover to cover :geek:

There are a few Northern English and Scots words that were left there by the Vikings :lol: Things like 'fell' (fjell - mountain) and 'beck' (bekk - stream), and sometimes the pronounciation is the same, like when they say 'oot' (out) or 'hoose' (house) it sounds like Norwegian. The craziest thing I heard is that the Geordies call a jumper a 'gansey' (we call it genser - pron. 'ganser') :D

I have a Kiwi friend and I hadn't thought much of her accent either until I started following FOTC:) Her accent is probably worn down a bit too, from living in Australia for years.
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munchkin
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Re: Learning Languages

Postby munchkin » Tue Aug 25, 2009 3:59 pm

Most Scots object to the Scots language being described as a form, or dialect of English as it apparently has been around longer than english. I really don't know, but there are sometimes debates on the TV and radio about the status of the Scots language.

I just also remembered another word.
When we moved form the town to farming country, my daughter elected to go to the local; college to finnish her schooling. On returning from her first day, I asked how it had gone. "OK", she said "but everyone seems to be called 'ken' ".

Here they use "ken" as the verb "to know". So you would say you ken someone, meaning you know them, and also if agreeing with someones statement, instead of saying "I know", you would say "I ken".

The Duch verb "to know" is "kennen". Conjugated ik ken, jij ken......

I find that really interesting.

Oh! My husband speaks gaelic.

Now! I must find me a thread about Gemaine's clothes. There's gotta be one around here somewhere.

*goes searching*

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seasick_sarah
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Re: Learning Languages

Postby seasick_sarah » Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:43 am

Aye, I "ken" the word "ken". :shock:

Also, the Icelandic word for child is "barn"...very similar to Scottish "bairn". I found this out watching a broken Monty Python DVD (or possibly a normal Monty Python DVD in a broken DVD player) that only let me watch with Icelandic subtitles. :D And got all excited because I'd found another related pair of words.
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Re: Learning Languages

Postby VaiVedrai » Wed Aug 26, 2009 3:14 am

I have Spanish and French classes back-to-back this semester. That's not so bad. The worst part is walking into Spanish and remembering everything I'd learned five or six years ago, and then walking into French (which I've been studying more recently and know more of) and forgetting how to string a sentence together without half-stuttering for the first twenty minutes. :oops:
If you don't know the answer, change the question.
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