Going green - an eco friendly thread

Everything else you can poke a stick at. And then some.
Sherry
Professional Blonde
Posts: 3961
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2005 9:57 am

Going green - an eco friendly thread

Postby Sherry » Fri Nov 17, 2006 1:03 pm

Its something near and dear to my heart, so I thought, rather than me rambling on in various threads on the forum, and conversation being scattered, I'd make a thread for the subject.

Eco friendly, green living, environmental and ethical issues, you get the idea, it can all go here.

I've been tussling with greener eco friendly living for a while now. I've joined forums, read large amounts of information and try to be as enviromentally and ethically aware in my purchases and my lifestyle.

I recycle as much as I possible can. And I'd encourage everyone here to do the same. You will be amazed at what you can recycle, either at a tip/dump or your own back garden. Plastic, glass, paper, cardboard, cans, clothes, shoes... these can all be done via a local tip, if your council or local Government have such things. You can also recycle garden waste that cannot be composted, old electrical products, car batteries, normal batteries as throwing them away is not a good thing.. the list goes on.

In your garden you can compost your kitchen waste and grass cuttings. Add in a bit of manure etc and you are away.

Anyways, to give us all an idea or two, here is How Can I Recycle This. A great website and you'll be amazed at what you can put to use, at least for a little while once you are finished with it for its intended purpose. It might not look as nice sometimes, but thats a minor thing if its stored in a cupboard out of sight. Its saving money and reusing a product.

Then there is The River Cottage Project. Its all about organic farming and growing of fruit and veg. Self sustaining. Has a great forum also and lots of ideas and suggestions how to live a more green eco friendly life.

For me, there is no comparison between pre packaged ready meals, instant food or take outs to good wholesome home cooked grub. And even better if its organic or free range reared. It really is a whole new experience on the taste buds to eat what you raise or grow. Locally reared or grown food is also important, if you can source it. You are supporting local farmers, know where the food has come from, taste the difference and will be doing your bit for the local economy. Its all good. I know in this day and age life is hectic, but try taking the time and see how it goes. You may well enjoy it :)

I've gone green and I am encouraging anyone who wants to give it a go to do so. If you think its too expensive, at least try some parts of it. Less meat, more veg so you can afford the free range chook or the locally farmed pork. Bulking it out with veggies is great. Its what we have done in years gone past, only in more recent time we have gotten used to more meat in our diet (unless you are a vegetarian of course :P )

Then there is The Times Eco Worrier page Always good for making me stop and think and take stock.

I know in this day and age life is hectic, but try taking the time and see how it goes. You may well enjoy it :) I know it has given me great rewards and satisfaction.

Anyone else got any green tips, energy saving advice or whatever and want to share, I'll be happy to read it.

User avatar
Johnnyp
The One Guy
Posts: 2052
Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2005 2:58 am

Postby Johnnyp » Sat Nov 18, 2006 10:06 am

I was pondering a few things about recycling. Don't you waste water when you wash out your plastic bottles before putting them in the recycling bin.

I was replacing the ink cartridge in my printer today. Now in the package they give you a postage paid envelope to send your old cartridge back. The thing is I buy my cartridges in a twin pack. Lets look at this twin pack. Lets go from the outside in. They come in a cardboard box. Pretty much standard stuff at this point, right ? Inside the box is a mini catalog of they're newest whiz bang items. Then both cartridgees sit in a molded plastic tray. Then there are the two cartridges that each have another mini-literature promo thing stuck to them. Also stuck to the side of the cartridges in a separate plastic wrapper is the cartridge recycling envelope. The cartridges are also separately wrapped plastic packages. Inside the individual cartridge envelope carefully cradling the cartridge is a piece of cardboard. Are you thinking what I'm thinking. Oh and it looks something like this http://67.18.219.83/image_hosting/web_p ... CF3270.JPG

User avatar
Pineapple
Registered Rhymnecologist
Posts: 417
Joined: Tue Apr 25, 2006 3:15 am

Postby Pineapple » Sat Nov 18, 2006 11:38 pm

HP = HyPocrites.
Image
'Along comes Michael... On his bicycle... Lookin' as cool as a Fisher and Paykel...'

Goodbye Babylon
Giving the paper to the people
Posts: 60
Joined: Mon May 14, 2007 5:29 am

Postby Goodbye Babylon » Wed May 16, 2007 11:17 am

Easy things to do:
-change lightbulbs to those energy efficient swirly ones (you really do save on energy bills)
-take canvas bags to the supermarket
-plant treees
a squirrel is the same as a can.....
when there is a bb gun in my hand

User avatar
Deirdre
David Bowie's nipple antennae
Posts: 1034
Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2005 11:49 pm

Postby Deirdre » Thu May 17, 2007 3:15 am

And remember to throw a few tote bags into the car for when you go into a store. I haven't taken a plastic or paper bag since Earth Day.

Once I forgot my bags, so I put the paid for food back into the cart and loaded it into my car without bags. It's a matter of principle. Once I say I'm going to do something, dammit... :hammer:

Goodbye Babylon
Giving the paper to the people
Posts: 60
Joined: Mon May 14, 2007 5:29 am

Postby Goodbye Babylon » Thu May 17, 2007 3:11 pm

I'm guessing tote bags are similar to canvas bags. Its cool though now that clothes shops are handing them out now. Their a bit trendier than the bright green ones that I usually take everywhere.

That would've been a pain loading the food in & out of the trolley & into the car. Good on you for sticking to that principle.

Oh and try to buy local stuff especially from your local fruit market or butcher. THis is to mainly cut down on gas emissions that would occur when transporting the goods and to help out the little guys. Plus local products are fresher so they taste better, chemicals don't have to be used to keep them looking good and the people are friendlier.
a squirrel is the same as a can.....

when there is a bb gun in my hand

User avatar
Deirdre
David Bowie's nipple antennae
Posts: 1034
Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2005 11:49 pm

Postby Deirdre » Fri May 18, 2007 7:18 pm

I am so chuffed (did I use that correctly?) that there are like-minded people around here.

:whistle: Hopefully soon I can let you know about something I have in the works for a business. Not yet though... :silence:

Sherry
Professional Blonde
Posts: 3961
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2005 9:57 am

Postby Sherry » Fri May 18, 2007 8:04 pm

Deirdre wrote:I am so chuffed (did I use that correctly?) that there are like-minded people around here.

:whistle: Hopefully soon I can let you know about something I have in the works for a business. Not yet though... :silence:


lol D yes, the word 'chuffed' was used correctly. Made perfect sense to this Brit :thumb:

And I look forward to hearing what you are up to. I'm curious :hrm:

We've been busy and have chicks we are rearing for the table, well, not many atm as my neighbours dogs got in and killed most of them, so we are having to start over again, but ah well. I ranted on my blog about it all so will spare you the details here.

We also have two piggies and one of my pet hens is sat on a clutch of eggs.

Potatoes are in and due for harvest in June and some other stuff also.

Spring is a lovely time of year, all the wildlife with young, trees bursting into green and flowers blooming. Love it.

User avatar
Deirdre
David Bowie's nipple antennae
Posts: 1034
Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2005 11:49 pm

Postby Deirdre » Fri May 18, 2007 8:20 pm

It sounds idyllic there. Like living in times past, where things were simpler and a person could have a bit of peace. :whitey:

That is except for the neighbors dog. How awful! That must have been a traumatic day for you and those poor baby birds.

Not so chuffed now. :roll:

But you are moving on and making the best of it. Happy again. :D

Goodbye Babylon
Giving the paper to the people
Posts: 60
Joined: Mon May 14, 2007 5:29 am

Postby Goodbye Babylon » Sun May 20, 2007 7:27 am

Deirdre wrote:It sounds idyllic there. Like living in times past, where things were simpler and a person could have a bit of peace. :whitey:

That is except for the neighbors dog. How awful! That must have been a traumatic day for you and those poor baby birds.

Not so chuffed now. :roll:

But you are moving on and making the best of it. Happy again. :D


It does sound idyllic. I'd love to do the whole peaceful countryside permaculture thing in the future. At the moment I don't even have grass but I do try to grow herbs and natives. Plus theres hardly any rain and the soil is really crap here.

Hey Sherry I dunno how you consider eating something that youv'e raised. I'm not a vegetarian but to me its like eating a pet. My friend felt the same way when they adopted 5 abandoned baby sheep. Her step dad's mouth was watering at the thought of a future roast but we were like "look at that face you can't eat it!!" They probably have worms too.
a squirrel is the same as a can.....

when there is a bb gun in my hand

Sherry
Professional Blonde
Posts: 3961
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2005 9:57 am

Postby Sherry » Mon May 21, 2007 10:15 am

Goodbye Babylon wrote:Hey Sherry I dunno how you consider eating something that youv'e raised. I'm not a vegetarian but to me its like eating a pet. My friend felt the same way when they adopted 5 abandoned baby sheep. Her step dad's mouth was watering at the thought of a future roast but we were like "look at that face you can't eat it!!" They probably have worms too.


I consider all aspects of our meat and where it comes from. Have you ever raised your own stock before? It isn't like eating a pet at all, at least for me. You keep an emotional detachment. Sure they are cute and sweet when young, but that stage passes. Once you have a full grown sheep, cow, pig or chickens, its a very different reality. You soon learn not to be too sentimental about it.

I consider that I would rather rear my own animals for eating than purchase the mass produced, intensively farmed meat you buy in the supermarket. If its chicken, chances are its been barn reared in with thousands of other birds, in 24 hour artifical light, bred specifically to grow quickly (usually within 6 weeks) often does not grow feathers well, sits in excrement and some are cannabalised and pecked to death by other birds. They are often also so heavy from growing so quickly and oversized that they are unable to stand or walk properly. They are transported long distances to slaughter and the meat is often injected with water to fill it out, before ending up on the supermarket shelf.

My conscience won't allow me to eat meat like that anymore. I don't wish to give it up all together, as I like eating it, but I am trying to be more ethical and aware of where my food is coming from.

I opted to rear my own, from hatching egg to table, and they are allowed to live a good life, far more naturally than those poor buggers in the barns. We keep them under a heat lamp at night and outside in a run during the day when they are very small. Once bigger they are transferred into the hen house and allowed to free range over our land. They eat natural food then, grass, bugs, seeds and have that supplemented with organic feed. Then once they are grown to their full natural size, we transport them a short distance to have them professionally slaughted and finished. They live on average 6 months, not 6 weeks and this and the way they are reared makes for a huge improvment in the quality of the meat. Its much tastier and better textured.

Similar story with pigs for pork.

We don't eat meat every day, we often have meals with no meat in whatsoever, usually 3-4 times a week, but this is fine by us. But when we do eat meat, we know where it has come from. Our beef comes from a local farm a few fields away and we buy it at the local butcher. I know its been well raised and that the cows I see in the fields are the ones I'll be eating in a few months. The lamb is also farmed locally and we buy that the same place as the beef.

And lol about the worms. All that livestock running round in the world, I am sure a fair few have worms on occasion :wink: Lambs are cute for about 2 weeks, then they become these grass obsessed eating machines.

I find it strange that people have become so detached from the food they eat. So many people know so little about cuts of meat and what you can do with all parts of an animal with regard to cooking and eating it. Or about the process of rearing it and how rewarding it can be. Its all become so sanitised and on the shelf, pre packed people don't need to think about the conditions the animal grew up in or how it was treated before it died. Admittedly beef and lamb have more of an outdoors life, but its still mass farmed business, and they still are transported many many miles for slaughter, which causes them tremendous stress.

So ask me again how I can rear my own livestock and then eat them :wink: I think its an easy choice to make when you consider all aspects of it.

Goodbye Babylon
Giving the paper to the people
Posts: 60
Joined: Mon May 14, 2007 5:29 am

Postby Goodbye Babylon » Tue May 22, 2007 9:05 am

I guess when you compare intensely farmed animals to rearing your own you would'nt feel as guilty when it comes to slaughtering them. The way that your animals live would seems like paradise compared to more commercial farms.

No I've never raised stock. I've only collected eggs on my aunty's farm when I was younger. She has bananas, pigs and goats aswell but they were never slaughtered in front of me. I'm luck that I have access to a local butcher whose farm is about 40 mins away so the animalss dont have to be transported alive.

I think most foods are getting overprocessed. Like how scientists will say something like butter is bad for you blah blah then they take out of the natural good stuff and created margarine. Now margarine is bad for you. Even sugar gets additives to it.

We also tend to forget the old (more natural) ways like if you have a cold most people opt for pills and medicines instead of using natural acids. This includes eating lots of oranges or drinking a nice glass of hot water honey and lemon.

I have been thinking more about where food comes from now that I have to fend for myself. I've also started to do things like not peel my potatoes and carrots because its edible and I don't have a compost. But my mum freaks out and thinks I'm just being lazy.

If you do get an animal with worms do the all spill out when you cook it?
a squirrel is the same as a can.....

when there is a bb gun in my hand

User avatar
Deirdre
David Bowie's nipple antennae
Posts: 1034
Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2005 11:49 pm

Postby Deirdre » Tue May 22, 2007 1:30 pm

A great book to read on this topic is "The Omnivore's Dilemma" by Michael Pollan. It really opened my eyes. And I thought my eyes were already open. :puzzled:

Sherry is actually living like she's already read the book. Still it's a good read.

The meat issue is one I don't deal with because I'm a vegetarian. But since I'm an ovo/lacto, there are still the cow and chicken issues to be considered. I plan to become a vegan someday to remove myself from those issues as well. The factory farming situation is a disgrace in America. I do what I can at the moment, but there's always more to be done.

Goodbye Babylon
Giving the paper to the people
Posts: 60
Joined: Mon May 14, 2007 5:29 am

Postby Goodbye Babylon » Fri Jun 01, 2007 6:11 am

Deirdre wrote:A great book to read on this topic is "The Omnivore's Dilemma" by Michael Pollan.


Sorry Deirdre I don't think I have the attention span to read something like that. ( I read kiddy books)

Talking about books, I was doing volunteer work with a scientist who had read something in an enviro book that has just stuck with me.

The conversation went something like this but the scientist sounded more scientific-

me: Yeah stuffed cane toads is like a million dollar buisness blah blah. They also sold kangaroo testicle bottle openers and kangaroo arm back scratchers.

scientist: (cringes)

me: But they were just the waste offcut bits that get left over from pet food. Were the only ones who eat our national emblem anyway.

scientist: Funny you should mention that because I was reading in a book which is back at the homestead which says wouldn't it be better if we could farm our native animals for meat like kangaroos which thrive on our native bushland. We wouldn't have to clear huge area of land which means less enviro impact and problems like salinity ect. If we could put an economic value on the bush a lot more people would pay attention and be a bit more connected to the bush. The macadamia industry is huge and we mised out on it...

me: hey yeaaah *light bulb*

Anyway would this theory be possible to other countries. I think it would work in Australia because I know for a fact that there are environmental organisations who go out and cull large numbers of kangaroos each year because there are too many of them and they taste yum. There are also heaps of nice bush tucker food like cogla beans.
a squirrel is the same as a can.....

when there is a bb gun in my hand

User avatar
Deirdre
David Bowie's nipple antennae
Posts: 1034
Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2005 11:49 pm

Postby Deirdre » Tue Jun 05, 2007 2:45 am

It makes sense environmentally, I guess. It just never occurred to me that people and pets eat Kangaroos.

I think Americans live a very sheltered life when it comes to food. We pretty much eat fake things made of corn, corn starch, hydrogenated corn oil, corn syrup and high fructose corn syrup.

Little known fact... there's more corn in a McDonald's milkshake than anything else. They should call it a cornshake.


One thing, though... why would anyone want to touch a kangaroos testicle every time they opened a bottle? Is that another American thing? We don't much go in for testicle handling? Maybe it's just me. :oops:


Return to “Off topic rambles”



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 13 guests

cron