Bret set to star in the film "Two Little Boys"

AKA as the Rhymenoscerous, The Video Kid, Figwit and is one gazillionth of The Wellington Ukulele Orchestra. Yuss him and maybe some invisible people also...
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Re: Bret set to star in the film "Two Little Boys"

Postby Venus » Fri Aug 31, 2012 10:46 pm

TLB pics from my scans of the latest issue of FishHead magazine:

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Slightly different to the pic we've seen before:
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Re: Bret set to star in the film "Two Little Boys"

Postby Venus » Sun Sep 02, 2012 3:31 pm

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Re: Bret set to star in the film "Two Little Boys"

Postby Great H » Tue Sep 04, 2012 5:35 am

Oo Ooo!
Just got front row tix to an advance screening of Two Little Boys next week! :clap:
Ok so the front row is not so good for watching the film, but it will be EXCELLENT for the Q&A with Bret (and Hamish!) :cheer: :biggrin:
Yes I will take my camera! :lol:
Can't wait!

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Re: Bret set to star in the film "Two Little Boys"

Postby Nancy » Tue Sep 04, 2012 5:56 am

:yay: Way to go, H!!! :supz: Can't wait for your account of events. :-)

What's the date?
Oh, fish-like Lady
Lady-like Fish
I don't think so Bro, she's a Lady, Lady, Lady, Lady
No, no, she's a fish that's just a little bit
La-dy-ish! Yeah!

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Re: Bret set to star in the film "Two Little Boys"

Postby Great H » Tue Sep 04, 2012 7:35 am

Wednesday 12th. Should be good! :D

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Re: Bret set to star in the film "Two Little Boys"

Postby Nancy » Tue Sep 04, 2012 5:33 pm

Cannot wait! :popcorn:
Oh, fish-like Lady

Lady-like Fish

I don't think so Bro, she's a Lady, Lady, Lady, Lady

No, no, she's a fish that's just a little bit

La-dy-ish! Yeah!

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Re: Bret set to star in the film "Two Little Boys"

Postby Venus » Tue Sep 04, 2012 9:55 pm

:woohoo: Yay! I'm so happy you have the opportunity to go to an advanced screening plus Q&A and it will be even better with front row seats! I can't wait to read all about your experience, H! Haha, of course we'd also love to see photos if you're able to take any. :D There's no pressure on you at all being a WTFer at this event. ;) :hug:
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Re: Bret set to star in the film "Two Little Boys"

Postby Venus » Wed Sep 05, 2012 12:54 am

Interesting approach :lol:
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Re: Bret set to star in the film "Two Little Boys"

Postby gibbsrus » Wed Sep 05, 2012 11:21 am

Soooooo jealous!!! How are you going to sleep the night before.... and after!!!! :D Can't wait for the recount. Be warned.... Hamish is HUGE!!! He's a very tall boy

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Re: Bret set to star in the film "Two Little Boys"

Postby LauraK » Wed Sep 05, 2012 11:44 am

Congrats, H! That's so exciting!! Can't wait to hear all about it. :)

Ah Bret...I love you, man. Killing a hitchhiker so he'd know how it felt to play it in the film...gotta love the dedication.
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Re: Bret set to star in the film "Two Little Boys"

Postby Venus » Wed Sep 05, 2012 8:20 pm

Bret obviously takes his work seriously. ;)

New pic:
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Movie premiere tickets still available
ALANA DIXON
Last updated 15:09 05/09/2012


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ON THE SET: Actor and comedian Bret McKenzie in character as Nige, centre, during filming of Two Little Boys, with extras, from left Kerrie Waterworth, Fiona Forrest, Neil Cullen and Larissa Marie Colvin

Tickets are still available for Invercargill's movie premiere of Two Little Boys but event organiser Anna Dean says people should book soon to avoid disappointment.

"Don't kick yourself later, it's a pretty rare opportunity," she said.

The ticket gave access to the red-carpet premiere, a cocktail event before the screening and exclusive behind-the-scenes footage.

Festivities to celebrate the big screen showcase of Invercargill and the Catlins will begin outside the Civic Theatre from 5pm. Musical acts the Wellington International Ukelele Orchestra and Invercargill band Rhythmonyx will play. There will also be a display of muscle cars on show and the much-anticipated mullet competition - the winning mullet and a special guest will be invited to attend the premiere event.

Among those attending the premiere will be SBS employee Rhoy McMillan, from the lending support department.

SBS Bank marketing manager Mandy Oosterbroek said when producers of the film contacted the company to see if it was interested in being involved, SBS was more than happy to help out.

Mr McMillan, who has worked at SBS for the past 39 years, spent a great deal of time talking with the cast and producers, about what it was like to work for the company, and when SBS was offered tickets to the movie premiere it felt it was only fitting he attend "so he could see all his hard work pay off".

McKenzie's character, Nige, works at a bank.

Tickets to the event are available from the Invercargill City Council booking office.

Source

A Q&A with Robert & Duncan Sarkies on Flicks NZ:

Q&A WITH ROBERT AND DUNCAN SARKIES – ‘TWO LITTLE BOYS’
by Steve Newall, from The Flicks Interviews, September 05 2012

Kiwi filmmaker Robert Sarkies directed the upcoming Two Little Boys, a black comedy about Nige and best mate Deano (Flight of the Conchords‘ Bret McKenzie and Hamish & Andy‘s Hamish Blake) based on the book written by his brother Duncan Sarkies.

In the film Nige (McKenzie) runs over and accidently kills a Scandinavian soccer star in an unfortunate incident involving a hot meat pie, a ginger cat and a policeman. He chucks the body in a nearby road works hole and runs to his best mate of fifteen years, Deano (Blake). But Deano’s not the guy you should turn to in a crisis…

Robert and Duncan were kind enough to take the time out to answer a few of our questions, share a clip from the film and some behind the scenes footage.

Hello from Flicks.co.nz. How are you doing?
ROB & DUNCAN: Good thanks, yeah good, yep, yourself?

Yeah, fine thanks. What should people expect from Two Little Boys?
DUNCAN: Quite a wild ride. A lot of strange male bonding. Some stunning scenery and nature. Memorable scenes where bogans interact with sea lions, dolphins, penguins and toasted sandwiches. A few moments of claustophobia. Lots of bad decion making under pressure. A lot of laughs, a few moments that will make you groan, and even a dash of pathos. It’s a cool story.

ROB: It’s not Flight of the Conchords meets Hamish and Andy which I suspect is what lots of people will expect. I don’t think they’ll be disappointed but they will be surprised (and perhaps even shocked even if we’re lucky). It’s a Sarkies Brothers film featuring Bret McKenzie and Hamish Blake fully committing to playing out a couple of crazy southern bogans to the extreme. The film is funny, it’s dark, it’s kind-of mad and even quite epic at times (well, epic for a bogan buddy movie).

When reading Duncan’s book, what made you go “This is a film”?
ROB: I loved the book’s mix of comedy, emotional intensity and stoner wisdom. I could see it had a fascinating relationship at its core, distinctive characters with big problems to solve and not a lot of emotional maturity to solve them, which made it ripe for comedy. It was a mateship story that I felt touched on a lot of truths within relationships. It made me laugh, it made me cringe and it also had a surprising tenderness to it at times.

Was it awkward to think about doing a murder-comedy while making Out of the Blue?
ROB: Not really. If anything it was a bit weird taking a break from working on black comedy scripts with Duncan to do Out of the Blue with Graeme Tetley. I like to have variety between projects as I’d get bored just doing the same kind of film all the time. I think we’ve all got different aspects to our personalities. Out of the Blue was my more serious side and Two Little Boys is obviously a lot lighter. Hopefully in the future I’ll continue to do a combo of drama and comedy as both have very different challenges.

Why is the film set in the early 90s?
DUNCAN: There were less cellphones then. Cellphones ruin everything. The fashion was refreshingly hideous too. Seriously, the answer is probably that we were in our twenties then and carry a sense of nostalgia about that time that resonates well in the film.

ROB: I felt the story and characters had a naivety to them that an audience would more more readily buy if it was set back a bit. It makes it easier to laugh at their idiocy and not judge them for being idiots when it’s not contemporary. Also there were wonderful opportunites for visual humour with the wardrobe and hairstyles of that period which I felt would be a lot of fun – for us and the audience. I chose the specific date of 1993 because that was the year Tim Shadbolt was first elected Mayor of Invercargill and he has a small cameo in the film as – yep – the Mayor of Invercargill.

Was it difficult to reconstruct that era?
ROB: It was a challenge for the art and wardrobe departments although everyone found it fun as we were basically recreating the look of our youth – not a proud period in fashion. What helped is that much of the film is set out in the Catlins countryside where not much has changed and Invercargill itself still has a bit of a 90’s vibe. We actually had several eras to recreate as there are brief sequences in the film from the 70’s and 80’s also and even a quite extravagant fantasy set in the trenches of World War One. So yeah, we were busy.

Do you see the film’s setting as being a help or a hindrance to its international success?
ROB: I don’t see the setting as helping or hindering international success particularly. People are interested in stories and characters and if your film isn’t set in the US or the UK then it is going to be somewhat exotic wherever it plays. I think the more specific a film is to a place, the better. If you’re going to make a Kiwi film you might as well make it really Kiwi – and throwing in some spectacular coastal scenery surely can’t do any harm for an international audience.

Both leads are best-known as halves of different comedy duos. What was it like establishing a comedic chemistry between Hamish and Bret?
ROB: The chemistry was interesting to develop because we needed to believe these characters had been mates for 15 years but we enter the story when there is what you might call a negative chemistry between them as they have just broken up. So we needed to establish the heart of the relationship first before breaking it apart. We all did a fantastic workshop together in Wellington a few months before the shoot and this was where the dynamic of both the onscreen and offscreen relationship was established. Getting them Bret and Hamish to gel together as a pair was surprisingly easy, I think because they were both used to feeding off a comedy partner so it happened quite naturally.

DUNCAN: I loved watching them work together. They bonded very quickly. They are similar types of comedians in that they listen well and are at their best when they have a bit of freedom to improvise. The comedy aspect came naturally to them but for both of them portraying the twisted psyche of the characters was always going to be more of a challenge, and I am happy to report they nailed it. Hamish plays the control freak and Bret plays the controlled freak. When we were filming Bret lost a lot of weight and Hamish gained a lot of weight. Not sure what to read into that, except that it must be more fun being controlling than being controlled.

Could you share your strongest memory from filming?
ROB: The day which we dubbed our ’48 hour film day’ where we were washed out of our location and had to make up a replacement sequence on the fly sticks in my mind. Duncan was called onto set and was writing the new set of scenes in a back room while the crew were setting up what I thought would be a logical first set-up. No one knew what we were doing from hour to hour but we figured that as long as we knew what the next bit was and we shot in order we’d get through. And the scene is better than the one we’d origionally conceived. It’s fun when filmmaking is a bit rock and roll (although I’ll admit quite stressful at the time). More fun and less stressful was shooting the penguin sequence where all we needed was one shot of our character Gav with a penguin and what we got were reels of film with our actor surrounded by penguins as the sun rose on a perfect day. Pure magic.

DUNCAN: The final day of filming was really strange as it coincided with the horror of the Christchurch earthquake. Lots of deeply conflicting emotions that day. On a lighter note, the day we filmed Maaka riding a dolphin was brilliant. He had to ride a pretend dolphin, but as we were filming he was surrounded by a pod of real dolphins. One more memory that sticks out is the day we filmed the sea lion scene, which has a big argument between Deano and Nige. One of the sea lions took a liking to our camera. We were told by the DOC guy that if a sea lion approached our cameras just to walk away from the equipment. So we watched helplessly as a giant sea lion clambered up to an $80,000 camera. He sat and guarded it for a while, staking a claim to it I guess, before he shuffled off, much to the producers’ relief.

If you could make a film about anyone living or dead, who would it be?
DUNCAN: Bobby Fischer, Phil Spector, Nadzeya Ostapchuk.

ROB: I might keep that to myself because nowadays you can make a film about anyone living or dead can’t you? In truth when I try to think of an answer on the spot I just find myself wanting to sound clever so I’ll quit while I’m behind.

What was the last great film you saw?
DUNCAN: Searching for Sugar Man, a crazy tale of how an obscure musician from Detroit created a record that bombed, and he gave up on the music business, heading into
a life in demolition. Unbeknownst to him though his album was a huge hit in South Africa. It was a terrific film and I hope it comes back for a general release [It is - Ed].

ROB: I saw Beasts of the Southern Wild at the NZ International Film Festival this year which was pretty amazing. Incredible too that it was made by a first time feature maker. Incredible and just a little depressing…

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?
ROB: My dad once told me when I got angry to make things instead of breaking things. So my first short film effort depicted the burning down of what’s now the Art Gallery in Dunedin which meant I could make something while satisfying my pyro tendencies.

DUNCAN: “Don’t eat the yellow snow” (Frank Zappa)

What are you thinking about doing next?
DUNCAN: We have a film project about a guy who can’t find his socks, and another one about a man who has an illegal brain operation. There’s a lot more to both stories but we love keeping secrets to I won’t say anymore for now…

Two Little Boys opens in cinemas Thursday September 20th.

Source

From The NZ Herald:
McKenzie is soon to be seen in local big-screen black comedy Two Little Boys, which he shot on a break from writing his Oscar-winning song for The Muppets.

From a script based on a book by Duncan Sarkies - who penned some Flight of the Conchords episodes - and directed by Sarkies' co-writer and brother Robert, the film stars McKenzie as "Nige", a man who accidentally kills a Scandinavian back-packer and turns to his mate Deano for help.

"I read the script in a Harley Davidson themed hotel in Milwaukee when I was on tour with Conchords. I was laughing out loud. I had read a bunch of really bad Hollywood rom-com type films and a bunch of Hollywood comedies that I was going to audition for. But it was just such a contrast to read something I genuinely found funny, that I was just really into being involved."

Two Little Boys opens at local cinemas on September 20.

Source
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Re: Bret set to star in the film "Two Little Boys"

Postby Great H » Wed Sep 05, 2012 10:25 pm

Ooo, I hope Bret doesn't get himself into trouble with that little video if what he said is taken out of context! Especially since he's so darn deadpan about it. :lol:
I absolutely :heart: :heart: :heart: that cute/naughty little glance at the camera at the end that says 'you know I'm joking, right?' :lol:

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Re: Bret set to star in the film "Two Little Boys"

Postby Venus » Fri Sep 07, 2012 11:17 pm

Haha, I love that glance too. :lol:

NZ Herald:
Bret McKenzie goes from Muppet to mullet
By Russell Baillie
8:00 AM Saturday Sep 8, 2012


Two Little Boys star Bret McKenzie and director Robert Sarkies talk to Russell Baillie about getting their outlandish comedy movie the right shade of black.

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Bret McKenzie and Hamish Blake in Two Little Boys. Photo / Supplied

Bret McKenzie remembers feeling some major culture shock heading from Hollywood to Invercargill to make Two Little Boys.

One day he was writing songs for a little green felt guy in a Los Angeles studio. The next he was standing in his Speedos, turning blue on a Catlins beach, having one of many bad hair days.

"I went from Muppet to mullet," he laughs at his Wellington home about the peculiar style demands of the film, set in 1993.

McKenzie had taken an eight-week break from writing songs - one of which was to win him an Oscar for The Muppets - for the shoot in the deep south.

He had signed on after reading the script by brothers Duncan and Robert Sarkies, based on Duncan's 2008 novel, written while his older brother Robert made the acclaimed Out of the Blue about the Aramoana shooting. McKenzie had known Duncan for many years - he directed the first Wellington show that he and Jemaine Clement had appeared in together, and he had also written some Flight of the Conchords television episodes.

In Two Little Boys, McKenzie plays "Nige", an Invercargill bloke who gets into a spot of bother after running over and killing a Scandinavian backpacker.

Freaked out - "basically Nige is freaked out for the whole film. I must say 'f***' at least 100 times in that movie" - Nige turns to his best mate Deano, played by Hamish Blake of Australian comedy team Hamish and Andy. Deano is only too keen to help out, being the disturbingly loyal friend he is.

Madness, a botched body disposal and a trip to the Catlins ensues, which also drags in Nige's better-adjusted new friend Gav (Maaka Pohatu).

As a movie, it's not FoTC meets Hamish and Andy.

It's much more a film by the guys behind Scarfies, the 2000 local hit the Sarkies made about Otago student flatmates taking on the local drug underworld.

All of which meant for both McKenzie and Blake, it was time to act - and away from the safety of their respective comic foils.

"It felt a bit like we were cheating on our comedy partners," says McKenzie, "It felt like we were going off having an affair. But it was really interesting finding that rhythm with another comedian.

"Both of us come from a fairly solid background of being ourselves. So both of us were slightly in the deep end."

Robert Sarkies agrees that his casting of the pair may help audiences buy into the oddball two characters even if they don't like them much.

"I did feel for both of the characters, especially the Deano character - he's borderline psychopath really - that we needed an actor in that role that could let us in, we could feel for, who essentially felt like a nice guy."

McKenzie was intrigued by the balancing act the material required.

"The hardest thing I think, was trying to bring the reality of having killed someone but try to keep the comedy in the film. Because it's such a dark subject. Our aim was to make it feel real enough that you wanted to follow the story. And we didn't want it to feel like Weekend at Bernie's, which would be the worst case scenario - that it would become a sketch about getting rid of a dead body."

For Sarkies, Two Little Boys was a chance to cut loose after Out of the Blue and helming sci-fi television drama This Is Not My Life.

"It was sort of an audacious crazy story, the kind of films that they used to make in the 70s. Some kind of strange stoner buddy movie. I had just come off making this tragedy, so maybe I needed something lighter and odder."

The original idea for his brother's novel had been a joint one. And when he read the manuscript of the first draft he scrawled on it: "It's a film!"

But there was some adapting to do - the book was largely a first person narrative while the film uses a small amount of voiceover.

Sarkies also decided to shift the story back to the mullet-required years of 1993, to give the audience a different perspective.

"I didn't want people to judge the actions of these characters too directly. I think it's easier to look at the actions of your past. The actions of the characters are sometimes quite extreme but if it's set in the past it's got a little bit of a nostalgic glow to it.

"And add to that, you can have a lot of fun with the art direction and the wardrobing. Some scenes in the film are pretty full-on serious scenes. But the seriousness is undercut by a ridiculous costume that one of the characters is wearing."

The film also flashes back to previous decades and - for reasons best explained by the film - to the trenches of World War I, complete with Rolf Harris on the soundtrack singing the song from which the movie takes its title.

And it spends quite a bit of time in the lovely landscapes of the Catlins. Though despite shooting there in summer, those actors suffered in their jocks.

"The film looks a lot warmer than the shoot was," laughs Sarkies, "even though it was the middle of the summer. Quite often they were in their underwear, which we didn't do as a selling point of the film, by the way, it just so happened.

"When you put little thin Bret, medium Hamish and massive Maaka in a row in their underwear, its like some strange pub joke made for cinema."

But most of the laughs in Two Little Boys come with the rider: Should we be laughing at this?

Which is exactly what Sarkies was after.

"I knew I wanted to make a movie that played in the extremes and was extremely funny while also extremely dark, striking a tone that would be unusual but would take an audience along on this crazy rollercoaster ride and keep them with these characters despite their intensity and heinous actions.

"Striking the right balance of tone was the trickiest thing between comedy and tragedy. I didn't want one to overwhelm the other. I never set out just to make a broad comedy. I wanted to put people into the shoes of these characters which is an unusual place to be in.

"Sorry New Zealand, here's a perspective that you are not used to. Hope you enjoy it."

Who: Bret McKenzie and Robert Sarkies
What: Two Little Boys, a black comedy based on the novel by Duncan Sarkies also starring Hamish Blake of Aussie comedy duo Hamish and Andy.
When: Opens at cinemas on September 20]
Also: McKenzie and Blake are doing a post-screening Q&A at Event Cinemas Queen St on Wednesday, September 12 (6.30pm); the Sarkies brothers are doing one after a screening at the Rialto Newmarket on Thursday, September 13 (6.15pm).

-TimeOut

Source


Interview with Hamish:

Ozzie comedian makes his Kiwi film debut
September 7, 2012, 7:51 amnewideanz

Comedian Hamish Blake makes his film debut in Two Little Boys

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Hamish Blake knows how to tickle our funny bones, but the hotly anticipated Kiwi film Two Little Boys challenged him to deliver a darker style of comedic performance than fans of his TV3 show Hamish & Andy’s Gap Year are accustomed to.

The Duncan Sarkies-directed flick, which opens in cinemas on September 20, is a black comedy set in 1990s Southland.

It follows his character Deano and best mate Nige (Flight of the Conchords star Bret McKenzie) as they clash while trying to cover up the death of a Norwegian backpacker. Hamish revelled in his first film role, which involved some scary encounters with wildlife and plenty of underwear scenes. Oh, and lots of cheesy rolls.

We couldn’t help but notice your character happens to be Australian. How convenient.

Well detected. When this audition came up, I said, ‘I have to be honest with you guys and say I can’t do a Kiwi accent, and if I did do one it would probably be offensive to all New Zealanders.’ So in the film my character moved to New Zealand when he was six.

Did the Southlanders slug you with any Australian jokes?

I reckon because I was the guy buying the most cheesy rolls off them, they really appreciated the business. I could put away six or seven rolls at a time. They saw me as a walking gold mine.

An Australian newspaper gave you a hard time for your weight gain on set.

The headline was ‘Hamish’s big fat acting role’. My character maybe didn’t have the most nutritious diet, so I thought that I should put weight on for the role. That’s my story. Another way to look at it might be that we started filming in about January and I had a particularly festive Christmas.

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What was it like working with Bret McKenzie?

I was a huge fan of Conchords, so it was great. Our characters have a horrible friendship, and it was hard because off screen Bret and I were becoming friends, then on screen we’d have to go back into what was like an abusive marriage.

The film is very different to your normal comedy.

The chance to do something where you’re playing a real character was a lot of fun – and this one is a very dark, twisted, almost psychotic character.

Was it scary doing the beach scene where you charge towards a sea lion?
It was scary. We just kind of had to wait for a sea lion to show up. I’m trying to be angry and tough, but I was terrified!

You spent quite a bit of time on screen in your underwear.

I’ve done a lot worse things.

Source

The Dominion Post:
McKenzie takes a serious turn to acting
Bret McKenzie on bromance, mullets and pies
Last updated 09:00 09/09/2012

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SERIOUSLY, FOLKS: Bret McKenzie as bank teller Nige in Two Little Boys. Wait until you see his mullet - "just a slight trim on the sides", he says.


Being the star of Kiwi feature Two Little Boys means one half of Flight of the Conchords - Wellington's Bret McKenzie - has a lot on his shoulders.

To be precise, it's what touches McKenzie's shoulders - one of the most striking mullets in the history of New Zealand cinema.

It's just one of the aspects that makes Nige - the well-meaning, but naive and dim Invercargill bank teller character that he plays - unforgettable.

What will surprise audiences is that this isn't McKenzie, who won the Oscar for best song this year, simply reprising or extending his "Bret" persona from the Conchords.

As actors like to say, he really inhabits Nige. Nige is nothing like the parts we've seen played by McKenzie before, and that includes his two cult appearances in The Lord of the Rings and possibly his third Middle Earth role in The Hobbit.

This really is the arrival of McKenzie: comic actor. Starring alongside McKenzie is Australian comedian Hamish Blake, best known for Hamish and Andy and Rove Live.

"It's a much more dramatic film than what a Conchords film would be," McKenzie told The Dominion Post.

"People will be surprised if they go in expecting a Flight of the Conchords meets Hamish and Andy. The film isn't that."

But he agrees that when audiences first see him as Nige, driving around the empty late night streets of Invercargill in 1993, all eyes will be on the mullet.

"When we first got down there and they cut our hair, Hamish and I spent a lot of time stroking the back of our mullets. It's something I normally don't do with my hair. But with a mullet, you keep pushing it back, making sure it's looking good.

"It was also alarmingly easy to go from my normal haircut to a mullet. It was just a slight trim on the sides."

Blake, who plays Deano, Nige's unhinged and possessive mate since childhood, found another use for his mullet. Blake was required to have his head shaved for a scene, so auctioned off the mullet for charity.

"You could rent it out. He made a mullet wig out of his mullet," says McKenzie, laughing.

Other potential laughter material was McKenzie working with a pie. In the opening scene of Two Little Boys Nige burns himself trying to eat a hot pie while driving.

On the first night filming, McKenzie says he went through 16 pies. He forced down another 10 during reshoots.

"You forget about all the different camera angles when you have to bite that pie. You start enthusiastically eating these pies and then you realise you can't possibly eat that many pies that they need you to eat."

McKenzie, 36, first read Wellington-based Duncan and Robert Sarkies' Two Little Boys script three years ago while the Flight of the Conchords were touring the United States.

He was already familiar with the Sarkies thanks to their debut feature Scarfies, while Duncan had written two Flight of the Conchords episodes.

McKenzie says he'd already had offers of roles in other movies and had read "some quite bad Hollywood scripts of studio comedies". But he didn't like any of them.

"It was so refreshing to read something that I found really funny. I was really up to the challenge. I was so excited by how much darker it is than anything I've done in the past.

"There are two turns. It's the story about accidentally killing a backpacker and the guilt of that and dealing with this dead body. Then it's also the story of a bromance between three friends."

The third friend that comes between Nige and Deano is Gav, played by Maaka Pohatu. Some of the funniest scenes include Gav and McKenzie says in some ways the film should really be called Three Little Boys, such is Pohatu's presence and input.

Most of the seven weeks filming was ambitious, due to the multiple locations in Southland, including the remote Catlins, which McKenzie hadn't visited before. The shoot was early last year, at the height of summer. But most of the time it felt like winter.

"It was really cold. It was freezing, although I'm sure Tim Shadbolt [Invercargill's mayor, who has a cameo in the film] wouldn't want me to say that. It was an anomaly."

It included a scene were Nige and Deano go for a swim on a Catlins beach.

"It doesn't look cold on screen. But the crew are all wrapped up in these Antarctic Kathmandu Macpac super jackets and me and Hamish and Maaka are all in our underwear."

In another scene the boys encounter a sea lion. In the film it's for real, not computer-generated.

"We had to sneak up [to the sea lion] and they set the cameras up. The sea lion chased me up into the dunes and the camera crew had to abandon a camera because the sea lion went towards it. It was like a couple of bogans making a nature documentary."

Much of the strength of Flight of the Conchords is the interplay between McKenzie and Jemaine Clement. While much darker, it's just as important between Nige and Deano in Two Little Boys.

McKenzie hadn't met Blake before auditions but says the two hit it off.

"I had a great time. He is funny, quite ridiculously funny. He is always cracking gags. Some comedians are not funny in real life and he really is someone who is as funny as he is on TV."

McKenzie is unsure if the onscreen chemistry with Blake would have still been there if the two hadn't clicked offscreen.

"I've only seen that happen once on a job. It doesn't happen very often, but it can kill a scene.

"Without the playfulness, the scenes don't come to a laugh. It probably wouldn't have worked I don't think. But we got on really well - it's just a tragedy that Nige's best friend is a psychopath."

THE DETAILS

Two Little Boys premieres in Invercargill on Tuesday and opens nationwide on September 20.

- © Fairfax NZ News

Source
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Re: Bret set to star in the film "Two Little Boys"

Postby Venus » Sun Sep 09, 2012 6:37 pm

Prepared to go to any length to meet star
Hacked bogan look 'a sure winner' for mullet competition?
ALEX FENSOME

Last updated 05:00 10/09/2012


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DOUG FIELD/Fairfax NZ
NEW LOOK: Mia Nelson has cut her luxuriant black locks into a mullet in a bid to meet Bret McKenzie, star of Flight of the Conchords and Two Little Boys.

Mia Nelson's friends back home in Seattle think she is best mates with Flight of the Conchords' stars already, so she had to take the chance to meet Bret McKenzie at the premiere of his Invercargill-set movie Two Little Boys.

Unfortunately, she feels the only way she can be sure of meeting him would be to attract his attention by winning the mullet competition at the premiere.

So out went her lovingly cultivated long black hair, replaced by the hacked back bogan look made famous by the less fashion conscious. She is sure it will be worth it.

"I think I'm going to win," she said.

She became a McKenzie fan after the Conchords' hit television series. "I love them. It'll be really exciting to meet one of them.

"In the United States Flight of the Conchords is massive. If anyone knows about New Zealand it's Lord of the Rings or Flight of the Conchords."

Because Americans think New Zealand is a bit smaller than it actually is, they had no difficulty believing she had become best friends with McKenzie and his fellow Conchord, Jemaine Clement.

"I've told them we ride around on sheep together," she said.

Miss Nelson moved to Invercargill with her partner, an Aucklander who lived in the US.

He wanted to go to the Southern Institute of Technology, but she was expecting a more tropical climate, after she visited Northland for a family wedding.

"I thought it would be totally awesome and warm down here," she said.

She is working as Invercargill Mayor Tim Shadbolt's personal assistant, and her haircut became a point of conversation at the Invercargill City Council offices, with pro and anti-mullet funds established. "‘They were saying ‘You can't cut your hair, it's so beautiful' and gave me money not to do it."

Having had the cut at the Venom hair salon, she said she has become attached to it.

"I could be starting the next new trend. People are pretty divided on it so far . . . [they] either say ‘Oh my God what

Source (there's also a short video interview with her)

Wow, surely she will get to meet Bret!

Critic.co.nz:

Two Little Boys
Two Mates, A Murder, And a Trip to The Catlins


New Zealand’s best known film-making duo Robert and Duncan Sarkies have teamed up with Oscar winner Bret McKenzie and Aussie comedian Hamish Blake, of Hamish and Andy fame, for their latest Kiwi movie, Two Little Boys. Joe Stockman indulged in an early screening of the film and caught up with Bret and the boys for a gab prior to the movie’s release next week.

The Sarkies brothers are back on New Zealand celluloid once again with their black “bromance” comedy Two Little Boys. Set in early 1990s Invercargill, the film begins with Nige (McKenzie) accidentally killing a Norwegian backpacker. Unable to deal with the body alone, he’s forced to turn to his ex-best mate Deano (Blake) for help. They’re ex-best mates because Nige has left Deano after years of doing everything together. The story devolves into an epic adventure around the Catlins, as they try to get rid of the body and as Deano attempts to rekindle their friendship.

Deano and Nige can seem a little bit simple, especially when contrasted with the simplistic pop philosophy of the third wheel of their adventure, Nige’s new mate Gav. But the Sarkies brothers say the characters have real weight behind them. “The characters are all quite complex, but they appear stupid on the surface. These two characters, who are still little kids at heart, are trying to figure out these complex emotions, and trying to figure out how to end this long relationship.”

Deano is a big fish in a little pond, perfectly happy living out his life in a small flat in a small town, working a small job. Nige is looking at stepping out into the wider world, and Gav is the gatekeeper who is showing him new ways of thinking. Deano identifies Gav as Nige’s real problem, and decides he has to take him out to keep Nige for himself.

McKenzie had been interested in working with the Sarkies brothers on a project for a while, especially after being disappointed by the quality of the scripts that had come his way in Hollywood. “I’d been reading a bunch of fairly uninteresting Hollywood films, and I wasn’t very excited about them, then Rob and Duncan sent me this script, and I was really keen.” Though that’s not how Duncan remembers it: “Bret had been stalking us for a while, it was getting a bit embarrassing. Once he started having success with the Conchords we realised we could probably use him somehow.”

Adding Hamish, half of Australia’s best-loved comedy duo, to the cast could prove to be a masterstroke, especially when it comes to selling the film to an Aussie audience, which Robert recognises as key to making Two Little Boys a commercial success. “Any filmmaker wants as many people to see their film as possible, that’s always the point. But we weren’t willing to make compromises to make that happen. We would love for it to be an NZ and Australian hit, and a cult hit around the rest of the world.”

The biggest barrier to Australian box-office success might be the quintessential Kiwi-ness of the entire film. From the mullets to the amazing early 90s clothes, it’s as Kiwi as buzzy bees. Hamish enjoyed the experience of filming in Southland – apparently he enjoyed cheese rolls so much that he put on a few kilos. But mostly he enjoyed the mullet. So much so, in fact, that he had it removed in one piece so that he could rent it out as a wig to raise funds for charity. That’s right, it’s even on YouTube:
http://youtu.be/jze1NsH2RE4

Oh, and once you’ve finished watching that, go see the movie. Supporting the Kiwi film industry is important and all that, but in the end it’s worth seeing Two Little Boys just for laughs.

Source

Some pics from the Catlins taken by Paul. We've already seen a smaller version of the last one:
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This Thursday, Bret & Hamish will appear on FOUR Live at 4.30pm. :)
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Re: Bret set to star in the film "Two Little Boys"

Postby Venus » Tue Sep 11, 2012 1:28 am

Tonight's the night of the NZ premiere! :)

@TriggerWorld
Bret McKenzie & Maaka Pohatu preparing for their big #2littleboys premiere! @timshadbolt @southland_nz

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Source

@Southland_NZ
Preparations are under way #Invercargill #TwoLittleBoys

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Shame about the weather:

Weather plays havoc with Two Little Boys premiere
KIMBERLEY CRAYTON-BROWN
Last updated 05:00 11/09/2012


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NOW SHOWING: Two Little Boys director Robert Sarkies, left, his partner, producer Vicky Pope, their 6-month-old son Max Sarkies, and writer Duncan Sarkies check out the setup for the film’s premiere at Invercargill's Civic Theatre.

The red carpet is ready, the projector is in position and organisers are hoping the weather does not disrupt any more of the premiere of Two Little Boys tonight.

Director Robert Sarkies visited the theatre yesterday along with his brother, writer Duncan Sarkies, and producer Vicky Pope.

Robert said he was "totally blown away" by the scale of the work and what the city had done to welcome them.

"Not just the big things, which in this case is an entire 35mm projection setup in a theatre not really designed for that, but the little things," he said.

"We arrived at the hotel room and there was a personal note from the mayor welcoming us to the city and asking us to make the city home. And a little bottle of whisky which will be good to calm the pre-show nerves."

To come back and be so warmly welcomed was like coming home, Pope said.

They had been in contact with both the film's stars, Bret McKenzie of Flight of the Conchords fame and Hamish Blake from Australian comedy duo Hamish and Andy, and they were "buzzing" about the premiere, Robert said.

"Hamish in particular, he's just been waiting for this night forever, a year really. We can't wait, it's exciting." Bad weather was expected to clear by 5pm, and he hoped people would turn out to celebrate the film and enjoy the planned entertainment, he said.

Meanwhile, a specially-made projector room has been fitted inside the theatre to accommodate the 35mm film projector, brought down from Gore, which will play the movie.

Theatre house technician John Hodges said the box was modular, and would be stored at the theatre.

A fire door and ventilation system had been fitted and it was sound-proof and capable of running both film and digital projectors.

Special trusses had to be built so the room could sit on the slanted floor, and seats were removed from the back of the theatre to accommodate it.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

While a few changes have been made because of rough weather, the New Zealand premiere of Two Little Boys will be held at the Civic Theatre tonight. Premiere organiser Anna Dean said Southland band Rhythmonyx was to launch the outdoor entertainment at 5pm but would no longer perform because of the bad weather. They would be replaced with a DJ.

The red carpet had also been moved and would now start between the Invercargill City Council building and St John's Church on Esk St and finish at the east entrance of the theatre, meaning Tay St would not be closed. The mullet competition is scheduled for 5.30pm at the outdoor stage on Tay St. The Wellington International Ukulele Orchestra was to play from 6pm, but Ms Dean warned outdoor entertainment would be weather dependant. The pre-screening function for ticket-holders begins at 5.30pm, and people must be seated in the theatre by 6.45pm.

Source


Interviews!

Bret:
THE FLICKS INTERVIEW: BRET MCKENZIE – ‘TWO LITTLE BOYS
by Liam Maguren, from The Flicks Interviews, September 10 2012

New Zealand’s Oscar-winning Conchord Bret McKenzie stars alongside Aussie funnyman Hamish Blake (Hamish and Andy) in the Kiwi black comedy Two Little Boys, directed by Robert Sarkies (Scarfies, Out of the Blue) and based on a novel written by his brother Duncan Sarkies. Opens in cinemas September 20.

We were lucky enough to have a chat with Bret about the film (we resisted doing a roll call).

FLICKS: Hello Bret! How are you?
MCKENZIE: I’m great, thanks.

How did you become involved with ‘Two Little Boys’?
I’ve known Rob and Duncan for many years. I knew Duncan when I was in university, doing theatre stuff. When I was in the States years ago, they sent me the script. I thought it was really funny and really original. I was very enthusiastic and keen to get involved.

Your character in the movie, Nige, is passive by nature, kind of intellectually challenged and prone to panic attacks. Was it difficult for you to display all those characteristics?
It was definitely a challenge because Nige is so beaten down and his friend is such a psychopathic bully that it was quite exhausting to do the job. I underestimated what it would be like to play a man who’s killed someone while trying to keep it funny.

We were dealing with this dead backpacker and in order to make those scenes as real as possible, we had to treat the Norwegian corpse with a particular level of sincerity.

Do you prefer playing an elf or a bogan?
Good question. I think I preferred the mullet to the pointy ears.

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Was that glorious mullet of yours a wig or naturally grown?
It was surprisingly easy to grow that. It was just a trim on the sides. I was loving how close my normal haircut was to a mullet.

What’s it like working with the Sarkies brothers?
They’re a great team. They’re quite different; their powers combine. They know exactly what they’re doing. Rob is a really passionate director. He always gets inside the character’s head in every scene. He was really living the movie as it went along.

It’s quite hard to describe and funny to watch because when you’re watching the playback, his face gets all tangled up. It’s quite hilarious to watch.

Do they ever conflict or are they like the Coen brothers where they’re one conjoined mind?
I’ve never worked with the Coen brothers, but I’d say the way Rob and Duncan work, Rob being the director and Duncan more the writer, is that they give each other advice in each other’s departments but they keep their final says.

So, Duncan was on set giving advice to Rob but there were never two directors, which is great because as an actor, you don’t want two directors.

“I WASN’T AS FOND OF THE SPEEDOS WE NEEDED TO WEAR. EVEN SUMMER IN INVERCARGILL IS FAIRLY ARCTIC. THERE WAS ABSOLUTELY NO PROBLEM FITTING INTO THOSE SPEEDOS.”


Working on a set that portrayed early ‘90s New Zealand, did it make you nostalgic?
Yeah, I’ve always had a soft spot for Adidas stirrup tracksuits. I wasn’t as fond of the speedos we needed to wear. Even summer in Invercargill is fairly arctic.

At least the cold would’ve helped you fit into those speedos.
There was absolutely no problem fitting into those speedos.

How did Hamish Blake end up becoming your co-star?
We did some auditions in New Zealand and Australia. He ended up being the star for it in the end. It was quite unlikely, I guess. Neither of us is very experienced in film acting. We’ve both done a lot of TV and have spent a lot of time playing ourselves. But this was quite a change for both of us, to be in a fairly dramatic comedy.

Being an Oscar-winner, were you afraid of upstaging Hamish Blake?
Not at all. He’s amazing. We were both slightly out of our depth so it was quite fun sharing that experience and helping each other along the way.

What was your fondest memory of the shoot?
There were lots of good times. Hamish was really funny to work with. He was a blast.

One particularly memorable day was when we were filming a scene with a real sea lion. I got chased up a dune by one. We had to improvise with this fairly wild creature.

There were a few sea lions on the beach and I remember reading the script and thinking “How are we going to get these sea lions?” But I was told that there was this beach in the Catlins where these sea lions hang out. So we just went down there hoping there would be some, and there were about three of them.

While I was waiting to start the scene, one of the sea lions started chasing me up the dunes. Another one attacked the camera crew.

Was the sea lion attack the most dangerous part of the shoot?
Yeah, that was definitely the most dangerous.

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Newcomer Maaka Pohatu plays Gav, the third wheel in the film’s bromantic love triangle. Is he just as loveable in person as he is on screen?
Very much so. He’s a great guy. He’s fun to work with. With Gav, some of his earlier scenes are where the characters are getting along. They’re quite refreshing within the movie. Maaka and I spent a lot of time singing Yacht Rock in between takes.

Who played guitar?
We didn’t have a guitar. Just a capella. We also did a pretty mean version of Do You Like Pina Coladas.

Trying for another Oscar nod?
We were really trying to get it into the movie but it didn’t make it.

Do you think Jemaine and Andy will star in a film together, just out of spite?
I would love to see that film. Maybe they could do a Two Little Boys sequel.

Source

The speedos & mullet vs elf talk :lol:

Interview with Hamish:
FILM INTERVIEW – HAMISH & ME
by ADAM FRESCI · in ARTS, FILM, ISSUE 19 2012

With TWO LITTLE BOYS opening in a cinema near you, ADAM FRESCO chats to 2012 Golden Logie winner HAMISH BLAKE about acting alongside Conchord and Kiwi OSCAR-winner, BRETT McKENZIE; working with SCARFIE’S director, ROBERT SARKIES, and moving from TV comedy HAMISH & ANDY to his first movie role.


For a guy that won Australia’s prestigious Golden Logie Award this year (as “Most Popular Personality on Television”) and has just starred in his first major movie, Hamish Blake is pretty relaxed. He’s calling me from London, where he’s working on the third series of his hit TV comedy, HAMISH & ANDY, with Andy Lee), and despite his publicist saying I’ve only got 15-minutes to chat to him – we’re already past the half-hour mark.

Hamish plays Deano, best mate of Nige (FLIGHT OF THE CONCHORDS’ Brett McKenzie) in a pitch-dark comedy, directed by Robert Sarkies (SCARFIES and OUT OF THE BLUE), based on his brother Duncan Sarkies’ novel. But when I ask Hamish if he enjoyed the book on which the Sarkies’ brothers’ screenplay is based, he explains: “I read the script but chose not to read the book. I wanted to build the character of Dino in my own head first.”

HEINOUS BOGANS
So what attracted a successful comedian to branch-out into acting? “Well, I hope it’s acting!” chortles Hamish, before adding: “It was the lure of doing something dark, complex and gritty. I’m very lucky that my day-to-day job for TV and radio is basically mucking about – it’s a lot of fun – but taking on an acting role was something new and a way of stretching myself. The challenge was to become another person.” I mention to Hamish that at the screening I attended, director, Robert Sarkies, introduced the film as the tale of two “heinous bogans,” and Hamish agrees: “Deano’s a sociopathic and dangerous mate to have, but he has his human as well as his evil moments.”

TWO LITTLE BOYS certainly has its share of “evil moments.” When Nige runs over a Norwegian backpacker in a bizarre traffic accident (involving a hot meat pie, a policeman and a ginger cat), he turns to best mate Deano for help… But Deano’s idea of helping his mate involves sticking the corpse in the boot of a car, driving off to a remote spot, dismembering the body and chucking the remains off a waterfall…

As Hamish says, “HAMISH & ANDY meets FLIGHT OF THE CHONCORDS it is most definitely not!”

ANTI-BROMANCE
Hamish and co-star Brett had never met before filming last year. As Hamish explains, “spending two-months shooting in remote locations, we became good friends, and that real-life progression of friendship is reflected on-screen. Only our characters’ friendship is more like an abusive marriage between two blokes. My character overpowers Brett’s emotionally, and he takes some abuse from me. But off-screen? We had a lot of fun. Which was difficult in itself when it came to shooting some of the darker and more difficult serious scenes. Overall? It’s about power. Some people refer to our relationship in the film as a ‘bromance’ – but really? It’s a dark, but funny tale of what happens when a friendship goes awry. It’s about a dysfunctional friendship. I think it’s an anti-bromance. In Hollywood bromances, like THE HANGOVER and stuff, guys are dickheads but ultimately their love for one another wins through. But in TWO LITTLE BOYS, its guys being dickheads, sure, but they don’t always love each other.”

CALL SCORSESE!
So, I ask Hamish if he’d like to act again and his reply’s a categorical yes – “Call Scorsese, I’ve got the acting bug! Seriously, though – working on TWO LITTLE BOYS was like five-years of film school rolled into a few months. I went in fresh, with no preconceptions. I hadn’t even seen any of Rob’s previous movies. But as a director, he’s so passionate, fun and he has a great vision. He’s a generous person to work with too. It took time and patience to work with new actors, and he was never annoyed by my ignorance of the art of film-making. I was fascinated by the science of film-making, the tricks and effects, and learned as I went along, getting my head around the basics – like shooting out of sequence.”

I mention a scene where Hamish’s character carries a dead body out into a river and ask if that was created with cine-magic. “That was a real river and it was really cold. So, you could say I did all my own stunts! That “dead body” was a properly weighted and jointed dummy which weighed as much as a real person. Brett and I were exhausted carrying it.”

I mention the movie’s late 80s setting and painstaking attention to period detail, and Hamish is quick to sings the praises of the Kiwi production team: “Every little aspect was there. The art department, costume, design, hair, prop’s – everybody did an amazing job. Everything, down to the tiniest detail, was so finely produced.”

THE OSCAR VS GOLDEN LOGIE DEBATE…
But what about his co-star winning the Oscar for his musical work on THE MUPPETS movie? “I’d rather not get into that whole which gold statue is better argument,” quips Hamish. “Brett’s got an Oscar. I’ve got a Golden Logie. Let’s just call them equal… and agree I’m the bigger man for saying so.”

Does Hamish have any advice for audiences? “See it in the right frame of mind, because it’s a real curveball and very different from what Brett and I have done in the past. It’s dark. But at its heart is a real male friendship based on the kinds of people many of us knew in the late 80s and early 90s. I hope it resonates with people.”

Source

Interview with Robert & Duncan Sarkies on View Auckland:
Two Little Boys Film Interview

Two Little Boys is directed by Robert Sarkies (Scarfies, Out of the Blue) and based on the novel by Duncan Sarkie and stars comedians; Bret McKenzie from New Zealand’s acclaimed Flight of the Conchords, Hamish Blake from Hamish and Andy and Maaka Pohatu who recently played a lead role in the celebrated stage play Strange Resting Places.

Set in Invercargill, New Zealand in the early 1990’s, the film follows Nige (McKenzie) and his best mate Deano’s (Blake) riotous misadventures as they struggle with their imploding long-term friendship which has been under pressure by an unfortunate accident involving a hot meat pie, a ginger cat, and the untimely death of a Scandinavian soccer star. Nige chucks the dead body in a nearby road works hole and runs to Deano for help. Trouble is, Deano’s not really the guy you should turn to in a crisis….

1. Firstly, who decided to make Duncan’s novel into a movie? And how did you get Bret McKenzie and Hamish Blake to star in Two Little Boys?

ROB
I read an early draft of the novel and immediately felt that there was a wild ride of a movie in there.
Seemed to me it had the key ingredients for the kind of films I like – great characters, a big problem for them to solve and a tone that was funny and distinctive. It also had a certain infintile naughtyness that I guess I was in the mood for.
I just rang Bret up one day and asked him. He read the script while on tour on the States and when he came back he told us it made him laugh out loud and he’d love to do it. Yep we were pretty stoked. We then got our casting director to ring Hamish’s agent and when she told Hamish there was an audition for a feature film role with Bret McKenzie he said ‘absolutely, I love Bret McKenzie!’. From that first audition there was a great dynamic between them and it very much felt like we were making a film with friends.

2. Did you both go to the premiere of Two Little Boys at the Berlin film festival in February?

DUNCAN
Actually I went to that one. Rob gave me a call saying "I've got some good news and some bad news. The good news is we've been selected for the Berlin Film Festival. The bad news is I can't go, so can you go instead?"
It was the best bad news I've ever had. It had a great response from the audiences over there. I pretty much just spoke to four types of people: Germans, kiwi expats, film makers and juvenile delinquents. It seemed to strike a special chord with all four groups. I don't know what meaning to extrapolate from that, but I'm sure it would make a neat Venn diagram.

3. How nervous is it watching your own writing / movie come alive on the big screen? Did the audience respond well?

DUNCAN
I didn't feel nervous as soon as I had seen a cut that I liked and I knew I was proud of. From that point it just becomes a matter of finding out how in touch/out of touch Rob and I are with the rest of New Zealand. Time will tell...

ROB
Duncan sent me an audio file of the audience laughing through the film in Berlin which was a bizarre way to experience a premiere while I sat at home in Wellington waiting for a baby to arrive.

4. So which one of you is Nige and which is Deano?

DUNCAN
I'm the younger, so yes, I'm Nige in a lot of ways. Robert had many Deano tendencies when he was younger. He would control which friends of mine could visit the house. I had a hyperactive friend called Peter who Rob decided he didn't want around any more, so Rob got him overexcited until Peter smeared toothpaste on the walls and then Rob declared that Peter could no longer come to the house.
These days I'm less of a Nige and more of a Gav. Rob is less of a Deano and has instead become that strange Uncle that everyone has, you know, the one who gets overexcited and accidentally scares children with well-intentioned over-exhuberance.

ROB
What? I protest! I’m nothing like Deano (and when you see the film you’ll understand why I protest so loudly).
For years Duncan has been creating extravagant lies about our childhood and spreading them in the media. He’s just jealous that I won the ‘who can keep the easter egg the longest’ competition when I was 12 (I still have the egg – ha!). Just remember Duncan is is a writer. Of fiction.

5. How was is working together, peace and harmony or a little bit of biffo every now and then?

DUNCAN
Seems crazy to report this after the last answer but I find working with Rob very harmonious. We have similar instincts most of the time, which is crucial, and I suppose unsurprising given we share genes.
We do sometimes disagree but we have so much respect for each other's opinions that we always listen to what the other has to say. And we have learned the art of disagreeing without being disagreeable. I think we've become quite sophisticated communicators, if I do say so myself.

ROB
Things were great until just now.

6. Was it a lot of fun filming? Besides the long hours and hard work - there must have been a few laughs while you were making the movie?

DUNCAN
Lots of laughs for me. As you can imagine a writer on set isn’t under the same pressures as a director. A lot of funny characters were involved in making this film. I enjoyed meeting Maaka and Filip (who play Gav and Jeurgen) and watching a strange friendship blossom between a heavily built Maori and a slight snuff-snorting albino Swede.
Hamish Blake cracks even more jokes in real life than he does as his TV/radio persona. It was fun watching Bret and Hamish jam. They were quite magic in their ridiculous banter. I loved meeting Tim Shadbolt too. He’s larger than life, that guy.

ROB
Being on set is always pretty intense for a director, even when you’re directing comedy. Being a director is like playing a role where you are pretending to be having fun and keeping things light but underneith you are always feeling pressure to make the scene work and keep to some kind of schedule. It’s the days off and the impromptu parties mid-shoot when you really can relax and enjoy it.

8. It’s great that the New Zealand premiere for Two Little Boys will be in your hometown - Invercargill, who will you be taking for that - and who will be your harshest critic?

DUNCAN
Actually we are both Dunedin lads. We’re bringing our Mum along. She doesn’t like the F word, so on that level she may be a tough critic. Once Rob and I gave her a copy of a book of short stories I wrote, and we twinked out all the rude bits. The book stunk of twink. She probably got high from reading it. It’s a bit harder to twink out the naughty bits in a film, unfortunately.

ROB
I’ll be taking my partner Vicky Pope who also just happens to be the co-producer of the movie. Yep we like to keep it in the family down here. You can make some terrific savings on hotel bills for the production this way too. My harshest critic will always be me which is a bugger as I can never just sit back and enjoy anything I have made.

Best of luck for the premiere - I know New Zealand and Australian audiences will love it!
Thank you for your time as well - and long live the mullet, let’s hope this movie brings them back into fashion!


Thanks. Long live the mullet. And long live T Shirts tucked into track pants. All fashion crimes eventually come
back into fashion. - DUNCAN

Source
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