Great interview with Bret McKenzie - he actually says ALOT

Conchords news, chit chat, waffle and conversation. Also convo about Bret and Jemaine in Conchords mode
Sherry
Professional Blonde
Posts: 3961
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2005 9:57 am

Great interview with Bret McKenzie - he actually says ALOT

Postby Sherry » Mon Jul 30, 2007 8:55 pm

Bret McKenzie of Flight Of The Conchords

Interviewed by Amelie Gillette
July 27th, 2007


Bret McKenzie and Jemaine Clement—better known as "New Zealand's fourth most popular folk parody band," Flight Of The Conchords—have been performing together since 1998, but until about two years ago, when their stellar HBO One Night Stand performance aired, they were virtually unknown in America. Then again, it takes a while for comedy so quietly absurd to ripple across oceans. Onstage, McKenzie and Clement are low-key: Sitting on two stools, guitars in hand, they trade deadpan banter between pitch-perfect send-ups of everything from Marvin Gaye to David Bowie to hip-hop.

Those songs naturally play a big role in Flight Of The Conchords, their sly, funny half-hour comedy for HBO. In it, McKenzie and Clement play Kiwi bandmates Bret and Jemaine, perpetuating the roles they played in the BBC radio series Flight Of The Conchords, and onstage in infrequent but hilarious live performances. McKenzie recently spoke to The A.V. Club about translating their live act to television, working with friends, the creepiness of MySpace, and living in the shadow of Cop Rock.

The A.V. Club: Three years ago, you didn't even have a website. Now you have something like 18,000 MySpace friends.

Bret McKenzie: They're not our real friends, though. We're still quite lonely. We feel cheated by the Internet. I wanted to have a birthday party and invite them all, but… too freaky. I would probably have to have a party somewhere big, maybe Central Park… I'm not really a big fan of MySpace. Think it's evil. Corrupt.

AVC: But you have the page anyway?

BM: Jemaine is the MySpace guy. I don't go on it. You can ask him about it. I feel pressure to go on it. It seems to be the way everyone's working now.

AVC: Pressure?

BM: I don't really feel pressure. I don't know, it seems a lot of people get addicted to that thing. To collecting more friends. It seems kind of weird.

AVC: A lot of comedians seem to get particularly addicted to it.

BM: I think comedians probably because they're lonely travelers, and they sit in hotel rooms, making up for the loneliness by collecting fake friends.

AVC: Are you thinking of anyone in particular?

BM: [Laughs.] So many people. It's really more who I'm not referring to.

I think it's really bad. I think it's helped us. Well, YouTube's made us popular, not MySpace. Thanks to YouTube, people know who we are. We haven't done much in America. We just did One Night Stand for HBO. And we don't play live very often. So until the show comes out, the only reason people have heard of us is through YouTube, really. It's kind of weird. But I guess a lot of people are like that now. YouTube's made a lot of bands and weird comedy acts more popular.

AVC: Did you like shooting the show in New York?

BM: Yeah, it was cool. We got to use a lot of our friends in the comedy world—Todd Barry and Demetri Martin and Eugene Mirman. We got a lot of those guys to play cameos in our show. Pretty much everyone we've met—especially a lot of the guys who tour, people we've met touring the UK and doing comedy fests in America. And it was pretty cool, because we often wrote the roles with them in mind, so I think the voice comes through strongly for the characters, because we knew what kind of comedians they were and wrote to their strengths.

The weather was really extreme. We started shooting in the snow, and then we stopped shooting last week in extreme, sweltering humidity. But I think extreme exhaustion just gave us our desperate edge. That's what you need to create something new.

AVC: People can tell from looking at you.

BM: Yeah, you notice throughout the series, we get progressively darker under the eyes. We're just sleep-deprived. We shot five days a week and then recorded music and rewrote the scripts on the weekend, so we've worked seven days a week since the beginning of the year. So to say we were kind of burnt-out would be an understatement. But I think it was worth it. We came up with some funny stuff. There were a few jokes.

AVC: You did a Conchords radio show for the BBC. Is this a television translation of that show?

BM: Well it definitely has, um, enough similarities that warrant us being concerned. We think we might sue us.

The radio show was a stepping stone to this show. I mean, that show was about us trying to make it as a band in London, and this show is about us trying to make it as a band in New York, so there's definitely some very clear similarities. And I think, doing the radio show, we developed a style of working and telling stories that helped us kind of know which ways we wanted to go about creating this show. We wanted to incorporate an element of improvisation as well as a scripted story to go off of.

AVC: Do you prefer doing comedy for radio or for TV?

BM: I think the radio is kind of cool, because you're really free to do whatever you want, because you can go into another world. Whereas in TV, you have to make that world. I still like doing radio comedy. But it was fun showing up on set, and they'd built a spaceship and stuff like that. I mean, that was more fun than going to work and pretending you're in a spaceship.

AVC: Did you enjoy seeing people creating the things you'd written about?

BM: Yeah, that was really cool, like, arriving on set—Dan Butts was the design guy, and he always just did these outstanding things. Every show has one or two music videos in it, and often they went into fantasy worlds. And he would have created these spaceships, or the 1970s, or the Miss Universe contest, or a tropical island covered in mermaids. No, it was an underwater mermaid world. Honestly, it was really great, just better than my expectations. That was really cool.

AVC: Did some things work better on radio than on TV?

BM: Well, the radio show, we only did six shows. For TV, we did 12. So we did a lot more work on the TV show. And, well, I'm not sure what worked better. I don't know yet. Can't tell. I mean, obviously you can do different jokes. It was a lot of fun doing the visual jokes on the TV show. Like falling over.

AVC: Do you do that a lot on the show?

BM: I fall over once when I'm sporting an eyepatch in an attempt to look cool. David Bowie gives me some advice in a dream to wear an eyepatch, and I have trouble with depth perception and fall over.

AVC: Did you have any hesitations about the way you incorporate songs into the show?

BM: Yeah, we watched Cop Rock, and that terrified us, and then we just kind of held our breath and gave it a go. We were worried. The fact that it's a comedy helps—you get away with that strange moment when people just break into a song. But I think we thought that was funny anyway, people just starting to sing. We put a lot of care into those transitional moments, to try and make them work, because it can be a very difficult moment in a show. It works better with some songs than others. We tried a variety of different methods throughout the show, whether we go into a complete other fantasy world of one of the character's minds, or there's a blurry half-reality when the rest of the world can't hear 'em.

AVC: Like an inner-monologue song?

BM: Yeah, yeah. We kind of play around with different styles. We had a back catalogue of songs, and we just used them all up. And then we wrote some new ones. We wrote probably half a dozen new songs.

AVC: And how did you figure out which songs you wanted to use in which styles?

BM: Well the songs usually explain them by themselves. Like, we had a song about David Bowie that clearly had to be in some sort of fantasy world. And the mermaid song, likewise. We couldn't actually meet a mermaid in the show, because the show is set in the real world. Even though it's a fairly strange world, there aren't robots or aliens living among us.

AVC: How did the show come about? Did you approach HBO with the idea?

BM: No, they approached us. We're not the sort of guys that would approach anyone with an idea, as you would probably know, having caught up with us over the years. We do whatever sort of falls in front of us.

AVC: Did they approach you backstage at Aspen?

BM: They did, yeah. They had to wait, because we were on an NBC deal. But as soon as that finished, they asked us to write a pilot and teamed us with James Bobin, who has literally now become the third Conchord. I mean, he won't play the show, but it wasn't just me and Jemaine, it was me, Jemaine, and James. He lives in Los Angeles, so we wrote there and filmed it in New York last summer, and they liked it and asked us to write 12 episodes, and we took a month off and then came back and started writing. We wrote for about three and a half months in L.A., then came to New York and started filming.

AVC: That sounds fast.

BM: It was fast. We really haven't done anything else for the past year. We've had a little time off, but it's been a huge project. The three of us together, I think, we wrote a lot of the scripts—five scripts—and then we found other writers to help us write first drafts on them.

AVC: When HBO said "Would you like to do a show with us?" did you hesitate?

BM: Well, I think we'd toured so much that we were kind of sick of touring, so doing a show was new and interesting, and that was one of the main reasons I did it. But yeah, there was a lot of concern about how it would translate from the live act, because it doesn't easily translate. But everyone said that HBO would be the best place for us to do it, because we tried doing it with NBC, and they didn't pick it up. And I think it was probably lucky that they didn't, because we had time to develop, and we did the radio shows for the BBC, and I think we got kind of a clearer idea about how we would translate our show to a TV show.

AVC: It probably would've been a totally different show if it had been on NBC.

BM: We wrote the NBC pilot, and it was a little broader. It was us living in L.A., and we had an American manager rather than a New Zealand manager. I mean, it was pretty similar, but it would probably have been a very different show, because we weren't as experienced.

AVC: Did you have HBO in New Zealand?

BM: No, HBO doesn't make it to New Zealand, but some of the shows get picked up by a local television company. Like, Sopranos plays over there. Curb Your Enthusiasm plays over there.

AVC: So you were sort of familiar with HBO when they approached you?

BM: Not to the point when I knew it was sort of the cool channel. I didn't know it was the alternative channel—which it seems to be. I had no idea, the difference between ABC and HBO. But now that I've worked for them, I've heard a lot about it. And they have been, creatively, incredibly supportive. They've let us do, almost, like, 90 percent of what we want. It's pretty amazing. We'll feel pretty guilty if the show doesn't work.

AVC: So you don't have to get script approval?

BM: They're pretty involved in the script, but they've just given notes that we've agreed with, on the whole. We only re-shot one scene. They were really happy with the episodes that have come in. Yeah, they've helped us with the scripts, but generally, they were happy with what we were doing.

AVC: Was there anything they didn't want you to do?

BM: Some casting. They didn't like our choices. But that was it. Honestly, they were really small things in comparison to the time we spent on the show. For small roles, we'd suggest someone, and they weren't confident with that person. It's probably not really cool to give a name. And I think, to their credit, the casting's come out pretty well. So they might have been right. Sometimes their experience was useful to have. Jemaine and I haven't made a TV show, and James [Bobin] has made Da Ali G Show, but it wasn't a narrative show, so all three of us were kind of finding our way through the project.

AVC: Did you have any influences when it came to what you wanted the show to be like?

BM: The Monkees meet the monkeys. We didn't want a studio audience. We wanted it to kind of deal with surreal ideas in a very ordinary way, because that's kind of what we do onstage a lot. It was really all driven by the songs, actually. There wasn't as much creative freedom as you'd imagine, because the songs kind of drew lines as to what we could do, what the stories would do. Early on, we'd considered doing a variety show, kind of like Mr. Show? But we wanted to try doing half-hour stories. We wanted to try our acting, and hopefully we got better. Some of our acting—I can't really talk for Jemaine, but some of my acting was unreliable. I kept having to ask James whether he could read what my face was doing.

AVC: Well, your thing is kind of being deadpan…

BM: My acting's very understated. I think my sad and happy don't play that differently onscreen.

AVC: Do you still enjoy performing live?

BM: We haven't played in a really long time, so it'll be interesting getting onstage and trying to remember the songs. I'm concerned that the crowd might know us too well at this point. The YouTube people might be correcting us.

AVC: Do you ever have people sing along to your songs?

BM: The last time we played in New York, people started singing along. Last time we played was in December of last year, after the HBO One Night Stand had come out, and the audience was singing along—too much. It became a little bit of a classic hits concert. It was terrifying. If you get to see us, you won't believe it compared to the days no one knew us. And the strange thing is, the audience sings along, and they sing the jokes. It's not particularly funny any more, it's just like singing along. It's a new type of performance which we haven't really tried, so we'll have to figure out what to do with that. We'll try it out, and if it doesn't work, we'll just never play live again.

AVC: Really?

BM: Yeah, just disappear.

AVC: What's it like standing on the precipice of fame?

BM: It's curious. There's a lot of positive feedback about it, but you can't tell until it actually starts airing more. Apparently there was a similar hype about Cop Rock, when that was about to come out.

AVC: Do people keep comparing you to Cop Rock?

BM: I do. Executives early on did. Well, we'd bring it up, because we'd heard it was a musical. And then we'd see the fear in their eyes.

Taken from here
Last edited by Sherry on Mon Jul 30, 2007 9:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Sherry
Professional Blonde
Posts: 3961
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2005 9:57 am

Postby Sherry » Mon Jul 30, 2007 9:03 pm

A few things of note

a) Bret is not a fan of TheArseOfTheInter.. I mean MySpace. He did have a page there for a while where he attempted to keep in touch with his mates but once the series began airing the profile was deleted. And I guess people can pretty much figure now that its Jemaine doing all the comments there :wink: That was no huge surprise to me anyways :P

b) The comments about stopping performing live if the act no longer works struck me. If Bret was being serious or not.... But I do admit to wondering how the live act will continue if people sing their songs back at them :roll: I think if they don't do more TV and write a new set of songs for a new show to take on the road they would be safe. But if they sing their old stuff used in the series, I can see they might have problems. And the inbetween banter would seem strangly out of place to many... How I long for the days of small intimate venues and great live sets from two great comedians :sosad:

So many thoughts on this interview.

My main one is that I wonder if TV really will be the end of the Conchords as we know them :roll: If thats the price to pay, then I'll be inventing a Tardis to go back in time and unmake the HBO series :wtf:

Katie

Postby Katie » Tue Jul 31, 2007 12:28 am

Yeah, I hate reading things on the Internet compared to hearing the tone in some one's voice or seeing their expressions... so therefore I'm really curious to see if Bret was being sarcastic or not about not playing live again, or if it will be the end of the Conchords. [Like Sherry said]

I really hope he was being sarcastic... they are creative enough where they can take time off and right whole new songs and go on tour again.. if that's what they choose to do. I really hope that's what they're going to do, because that would just be talent wasted if they didn't.

User avatar
poptartgirl
David Bowie's nipple antennae
Posts: 1063
Joined: Sun Nov 27, 2005 2:20 am

Postby poptartgirl » Tue Jul 31, 2007 1:25 am

I understand what he's referring to with the crowd singalongs. I've only seen them perform once (SXSW 2006). I recall people frequently yelling out requests and Bret's reply was something along the lines of "I'm not a jukebox".
I was cringing slightly simply because the official showcases at SXSW are brief and there's not a lot of time for banter and chatting. My thinking is along the lines of "let them play what they want to play" and shouting out requests only if asked by the performer.
Are FOTC "victims" of their own popularity ? I guess that's a matter of debate.


Jennifer
“We tell you lies, and if you laugh, they’re jokes.”

"all I wanted to say is "May I rock you ?"

thefiteboy
New arrival
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2007 7:00 am

Postby thefiteboy » Tue Jul 31, 2007 8:53 am

Ooooh....this interview stings a bit. I would think that most fans see the guys as, well, guys. They come across as "yer mates", especially with the way they play themselves on Flight. They're funny, creative, and with a bit of the exotic (for us state-siders, at least), and so, you naturally want to get to know them.

Of course, everyone else wants the same thing, so I can definitely see where a twisted form of familiarity breeds contempt might come into play. What a shame if they feel they can't have shows the way they're used to because of audience participation. I suppose he's right--other than with ad-lib, comedians/comedy acts don't typically have audience participation in their sets.

Sherry, if you get the opportunity, please pass along to the guys that we really do want to be responsible fans. (possibly a good question for any future Q&A: What can us fans do to help make your performances better for you, the performers?)

JudyH
Lost but happy at sea
Posts: 30
Joined: Sun Jul 15, 2007 1:18 am

Postby JudyH » Tue Jul 31, 2007 6:31 pm

Was the El Rey show the last stop in the latest tour? If so ... I hope Bret and Jemaine were left with a positive feeling. It's the only time I've seen them live, so I can't compare it to other shows, but I understand it was a longer show than usual. There was a lot of quiet banter and it appeared they were enjoying themselves.

The sing-alongers have to learn to listen, because Bret and Jemaine are also great improvisationalists -- you wouldn't want to miss changes to the lyrics!

Sherry
Professional Blonde
Posts: 3961
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2005 9:57 am

Postby Sherry » Tue Jul 31, 2007 7:02 pm

The only time I've heard of people really singing along has been with US audiences.

I think maybe because of the You Tube effect where people only really see the songs not the banter inbetween and nor do they realise that the lyrics are liable to change people have forgotten they are comedians and view them more as a live band there.

I do think that not being on TV with the songs and writing a new show for each season touring (as they did for 2002, 2003 and 2004 elsewhere round the world) would quieten down the the sing-along-ers. Also not playing old stuff would help. I'd certainly not pay money to go see a stand up comedian each time he/she went on a new tour if they did the same jokes each time or took requests. Just because the guys sing songs does not make them any less a comedy act in my eyes.

That's what I like about Eddie Izzard. He writes new shows, tours, but never ever appears on TV with them or doing stand up. So his stuff always feels fresh and when the tour is over and the DVD comes out, you are happy to part with your cash for it as you know it'll never be anywhere else.

Let's hope if Bret was being serious about it (and the rest of the interview certainly reads like he was) that they are able to continue performing live in the US with a new show. And elsewhere in the world. It'd be really shitty to never see them tour a new show again :waiting:

User avatar
The_Elefunk
Giving the paper to the people
Posts: 56
Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2007 1:41 am

Postby The_Elefunk » Tue Jul 31, 2007 8:22 pm

thefiteboy wrote:Ooooh....this interview stings a bit. I would think that most fans see the guys as, well, guys. They come across as "yer mates", especially with the way they play themselves on Flight. They're funny, creative, and with a bit of the exotic (for us state-siders, at least), and so, you naturally want to get to know them.

Of course, everyone else wants the same thing, so I can definitely see where a twisted form of familiarity breeds contempt might come into play. What a shame if they feel they can't have shows the way they're used to because of audience participation. I suppose he's right--other than with ad-lib, comedians/comedy acts don't typically have audience participation in their sets.

Sherry, if you get the opportunity, please pass along to the guys that we really do want to be responsible fans. (possibly a good question for any future Q&A: What can us fans do to help make your performances better for you, the performers?)


Yeah. It does sting a little. I love FOTC. If I were to go to one of their performances, I'd probably sing a long. But I guess I'd have to sing quietly. :shhh:
Shush baby.
Shush.

Count down to my birthday guys: October 13!!

Kebab
New arrival
Posts: 20
Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2007 4:26 pm

Postby Kebab » Tue Jul 31, 2007 8:56 pm

If they are indeed a comedy duo first and a band second, then one would expect that they would evolve to have new material for gigs as their "songs" become part of the collective. The "old standards" are going to have anticipatory laughs prior to the punchline as comics who repeat their material often do - and I would expect this outside of American audiences as well. I haven't actually heard that American audiences are the lone culprits in the sing-along format.

In fact, bands that tour often comment that they love touring in the UK because of the increase in "sing along" interaction over the US.

Bret is certainly the antithesis of a media "spin" master with potentially insulting some of his audience with comments like "fake friends" and casually mentioning a retreat from live performance. Crikey. It seems like he's not aware that nobody takes the "friend" thing seriously. Becoming a "friend" is merely a way to get on the mailing list for heaven's sake......and to tip one's hat and appreciate one's work. Golly!

8)
The thing about the J-dog is you can't put a leash on the J-dog.

Sherry
Professional Blonde
Posts: 3961
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2005 9:57 am

Postby Sherry » Tue Jul 31, 2007 9:04 pm

The_Elefunk wrote:
Yeah. It does sting a little. I love FOTC. If I were to go to one of their performances, I'd probably sing a long. But I guess I'd have to sing quietly. :shhh:


The thing is, that most comedians would write a new show and tour it. What's happened with the Conchords is that YouTube clips have meant that people have learnt their mostly old songs and not seen much banter in between. The guys have worked night and day for months on the HBO show and new stuff, be it banter or songs performed at live gigs have of course taken a back seat. They've not had time or energy for live shows during all this.

A new set, kept off TV and toured in decent venues would solve the crowd singing along probably. I'd never expect to see a comedian still doing the same gags 5 years after he first did them, not in live show, and I'd not want that from the Conchords either.

I'm guessing and hoping they'll draw a line under all their old stuff now, even if much of it is new to the US audience and others elsewhere and that they go on and write a new set. I think the EP and studio album of all the oldies (and maybe a few newer ones also) would be a good place to leave them behind.

ATM live shows are all old stuff and people are overly familiar with them all.

And fans need to remember that its comedy they are seeing, therefore dragging out old songs in the middle of a new set would be strange.

Let the guys get on and do new stuff I reckon :)

JudyH
Lost but happy at sea
Posts: 30
Joined: Sun Jul 15, 2007 1:18 am

Postby JudyH » Tue Jul 31, 2007 9:28 pm

Kebab wrote:Bret is certainly the antithesis of a media "spin" master ...


I appreciate his candor. I'd much rather read what someone honestly thinks, than what they think I want to hear, and if those comments ticked off any segments of the FoTC audience so much that they don't come back ... well, I'll enjoy their live shows more.

Kebab
New arrival
Posts: 20
Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2007 4:26 pm

Postby Kebab » Tue Jul 31, 2007 10:14 pm

I appreciate candor as well, however, some of his comments seem in direct opposition to wanting to reach out to and be accepted by a larger audience which I can only assume they want in going with HBO. Going with HBO who have paid a lot to advertise them, setting up a myspace, etc. and then commenting on those that it attracts is kind of counterintuitive to me. Perhaps he is conflicted as well as to how big they want to be. (?) Perhaps his comment to "disappear" hints at that. *shrug*
The thing about the J-dog is you can't put a leash on the J-dog.

Sherry
Professional Blonde
Posts: 3961
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2005 9:57 am

Postby Sherry » Tue Jul 31, 2007 10:44 pm

I don't think its about being 'big' or famous for them. They just like doing what they do. Be it Conchords, Black Seeds, claymatiom shorts, full length films or their own individual projects.

I do think the HBO will be a one off series and not because HBO won't recommision. They (the Conchords) seem to like to not be tied down to any one thing, hence the one album deal with SubPop. Means they are not obliged to fulfil someone's else's expectations or demands.

And Bret really is not much of a computer user, so I can understand his feelings about MySpace and other similar sites. If you don't use it, nor have any great interest, it can't be much fun. I'm a avid computer and internet user and I bloody loathe MySpace. Would never have a page there and dislike having to visit, but sometimes venture there for research etc. It serves its purpose for people. Some even like it ;)

Worth mentioning that the guys (yes, one of them did tell me this when they first joined there) signed up to MySpace because of imposters. The guys actual friends were falling for it, so its almost like they felt they should have an official page there to prevent people being misled by fake Conchord pages. They felt it was a bit embarrassing having people pretend to be them and even their own actual friends being mistaken/misled into thinking it was the guys. Now they are there, its easy to maintain and there are loads of their real life friends actual signed up there also so its a handy way to keep in touch round the world. As for the rest of the MySpace friends, I can't speak for them, but its MySpace doing what MySpace does I guess :roll: I guess Jemaine handles it and Bret doesn't. I don't think Bret was trying to offend anyone on MySpace, just he can't get his head round it so avoids it. He says Jemaine is the one who deals with it, but I guess people commenting or friending them think it could be either or both of them, when we now know Bret's more likely to be flushing his head down the loo or running from the room screaming :lol:

User avatar
Amaria
Half a shapely halibut
Posts: 237
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2005 11:49 pm

Postby Amaria » Wed Aug 01, 2007 12:44 am

Bret feels the same way about MySpace as I do. Good egg. I too, appreciate how blunt he is.

It seems like he's not aware that nobody takes the "friend" thing seriously.


Oh, I know plenty of people that take the "friend" thing seriously. Not just regular ol' joes, but relatively unknown artists, comedians, etc. There have always been artists that enjoyed having groupies, and what MySpace conveniently does is it allows said artist to view all their groupies in one page, all of them fawning over the artist in plain view of the entire world. It's gotta be flattering as hell, and I can see why someone that is a little bit afraid of that sort of fame and power dislikes the site and what it represents.
Last edited by Amaria on Wed Aug 01, 2007 9:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

JudyH
Lost but happy at sea
Posts: 30
Joined: Sun Jul 15, 2007 1:18 am

Postby JudyH » Wed Aug 01, 2007 2:50 am

Amaria, I think you nailed it perfectly.

Might I add that some fans also tend to pester for replies and favors. Not always; I do pages for some bands with cool fans; but when you do comic songs and seem very approachable, some fans misinterpret that.

Weird Al, who actually does monitor his own page, has a rather strict list of rules posted. In fact, his message to the fans is a lot harsher than Bret's was.

Three comments, three different "fans," within one hour:
dude im going to see u on the 19th im sooo spyched!

duuuude im your biggest fan u are my idol visit my page sometime i have the white and nerdy song

WWUUUUZZZUUUUUUUUP!!!!!um..not much to say.just board.


It must get old, fast. And these were within the rules ... nobody used html, demanded a reply, or pitched a parody idea. I'd probably long for the good old days when fans had to write a letter, get a stamp and envelope, and mail it, myself ... until it's time to send out the next band newsletter!


Return to “Flight of The Conchords”



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest